7.3 Communicating with Instructors – University Success (2022)

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe additional benefits for interacting with your instructor beyond the value for that particular course.
  2. List guidelines for successfully communicating individually with an instructor, such as doing so during office hours.
  3. Write e-mail messages to instructors and others that are polite, professional, and effective.
  4. Know how to graciously resolve a problem, such as a grade dispute, with an instructor.
  5. Understand the value of having a mentor and how interactions with instructors, your academic advisor, and others may lead to a mentoring relationship.
  6. Explain what is needed to succeed in an online course and how to interact with an online instructor.

So far we’ve been looking at class participation and general interaction with both instructors and other students in class. In addition to this, students gain very specific benefits from communicating directly with their instructors. Learn best practices for communicating with your instructors during office hours and through e-mail.

Additional Benefits of Talking with Your Instructors

University students are sometimes surprised to discover that instructors like students and enjoy getting to know them. After all, they want to feel they’re doing something more meaningful than talking to an empty room. The human dimension of university really matters, and as a student you are an important part of your instructor’s world. Most instructors are happy to see you during their office hours or to talk a few minutes after class.

This chapter has repeatedly emphasized how active participation in learning is a key to student success. In addition, talking with your instructors often leads to benefits beyond simply doing well in that class.

  • Talking with instructors helps you feel more comfortable in university and more connected to the campus. Students who talk to their instructors are less likely to become disillusioned and drop out.
  • Talking with instructors is a valuable way to learn about an academic field or a career. Don’t know for sure what you want to major in, or what people with a degree in your chosen major actually do after university? Most instructors will share information and insights with you.
  • You may need a reference or letter of recommendation for a job or internship application. Getting to know some of your instructors puts you in an ideal position to ask for a letter of recommendation or a reference in the future when you need one.
  • Because instructors are often well connected within their field, they may know of a job, internship, or research possibility you otherwise may not learn about. An instructor who knows you is a valuable part of your network. Networking is very important for future job searches and other opportunities. In fact, most jobs are found through networking, not through classified ads or online job postings.
  • Think about what it truly means to be “educated”: how one thinks, understands society and the world, and responds to problems and new situations. Much of this learning occurs outside the classroom. Talking with your highly educated instructors can be among your most meaningful experiences in university.

Guidelines for Communicating with Instructors

Getting along with instructors and communicating well begins with attitude. As experts in their field, they deserve your respect. Remember that a university education is a collaborative process that works best when students and instructors communicate freely in an exchange of ideas, information, and perspectives. So while you should respect your instructors, you shouldn’t fear them. As you get to know them better, you’ll learn their personalities and find appropriate ways to communicate. Here are some guidelines for getting along with and communicating with your instructors:

7.3 Communicating with Instructors – University Success (1)
  • Prepare before going to the instructor’s office. Go over your notes on readings and lectures and write down your specific questions. You’ll feel more comfortable, and the instructor will appreciate your being organized.
  • Don’t forget to introduce yourself. Especially near the beginning of the term, don’t assume your instructor has learned everyone’s names yet and don’t make him or her have to ask you. Unless the instructor has already asked you to address him or her as “Dr. ____,” “Ms. _____” or Mr. _______,” or something similar, it’s appropriate to say “Professor _______.”
  • Respect the instructor’s time. In addition to teaching, university instructors sit on committees, do research and other professional work, and have personal lives. Don’t show up two minutes before the end of an office hour and expect the instructor to stay late to talk with you.
  • Realize that the instructor will recognize you from class—even in a large lecture hall. If you spent a lecture class joking around with friends in the back row, don’t think you can show up during office hours to find out what you missed while you weren’t paying attention.
  • Don’t try to fool an instructor. Insincere praise or making excuses for not doing an assignment won’t make it in university. Nor is it a good idea to show you’re “too cool” to take all this seriously—another attitude sure to turn off an instructor. To earn your instructor’s respect, come to class prepared, do the work, participate genuinely in class, and show respect—and the instructor will be happy to see you when you come to office hours or need some extra help.
  • Try to see things from the instructor’s point of view. Imagine that you spent a couple hours making PowerPoint slides and preparing a class lecture on something you find very stimulating and exciting. Standing in front of a full room, you are gratified to see faces smiling and heads nodding as people understand what you’re saying—they really get it! And then a student after class asks, “Is this going to be on the test?” How would you feel?
  • Be professional when talking to an instructor. You can be cordial and friendly, but keep it professional and on an adult level. Come to office hours prepared with your questions—not just to chat or joke around. (Don’t wear sunglasses or earphones in the office or check your cell phone for messages.) Be prepared to accept criticism in a professional way, without taking it personally or complaining.
  • Use your best communication skills. In Chapter 9 “The Social World of University”, you’ll learn the difference between assertive communication and passive or aggressive communication.

Part-Time and Returning Students

Students who are working and who have their own families and other responsibilities may have special issues interacting with instructors. Sometimes an older student feels a little out of place and may even feel “the system” is designed for younger students; this attitude can lead to a hesitation to participate in class or see an instructor during office hours.

But participation and communication with instructors is very important for all students—and may be even more important for “nontraditional” students. Getting to know your instructors is particularly crucial for feeling at home in university. Instructors enjoy talking with older and other nontraditional students—even when, as sometimes happens, a student is older than the instructor. Nontraditional students are often highly motivated and eager to learn. If you can’t make the instructor’s office hours because of your work schedule, ask for an appointment at a different time—your needs will be respected.

(Video) 7.3 Questions and Answers

Part-time students, who may be taking evening courses, often have greater difficulty meeting with instructors. In addition, many part-time students taking evening and weekend classes are taught by part-time faculty who, like them, may be on campus only small amounts of time. Yet it is just as critical for part-time students to engage in the learning process and have a sense of belonging on campus. With effort, you can usually find a way to talk with your instructors. Don’t hesitate to ask for an appointment at another time or to meet with your instructor over a cup of coffee after class before driving home. Assert yourself: You are in university for reasons just as good as those of other students, and you have the same rights. Avoid the temptation to give up or feel defeated; talk with your instructor to arrange a time to meet, and make the most of your time interacting together. Use e-mail to communicate when you need to and contact your instructor when you have any question you can’t raise in person.

E-mail Best Practices

Just as e-mail has become a primary form of communication in business and society, e-mail has a growing role in education and has become an important and valuable means of communicating with instructors. Virtually all younger university students have grown up using e-mail and have a computer or computer access in university, although some have developed poor habits from using e-mail principally with friends in the past. Some older university students may not yet understand the importance of e-mail and other computer skills in university; if you are not now using e-mail, it’s time to learn how (see “Getting Started with E-mail”). Especially when it is difficult to see an instructor in person during office hours, e-mail can be an effective form of communication and interaction with instructors. E-mail is also an increasingly effective way to collaborate with other students on group projects or while studying with other students.

Getting Started with E-mail

  • If you don’t have your own computer, find out where on-campus computers are available for student use, such as at the library or your local.
  • Many students have a gmail or hotmail account they use for personal communications. As a University student you will be provided with an email account hosted by the university. This is the email you should use to communicate with your faculty. Other email accounts may be blocked as SPAM. You can go in and personalize your email account and forward items yo other accounts.
  • If you don’t have enough computer experience to know how to do this, ask a friend for help getting started or check at your library or student services office for a publication explaining how e-mail works.
  • Once you have your account set up, give your e-mail address to instructors who request it and to other students with whom you study or maintain contact. E-mail is a good way to contact another student if you miss a class.
  • Once you begin using e-mail, remember to check it regularly for messages. Most people view e-mail like a telephone message and expect you to respond fairly soon.
  • Be sure to use good e-mail etiquette when writing to instructors.

If your instructor gives you his or her e-mail addresses, use e-mail rather than the telephone for nonurgent matters. Using e-mail respects other people’s time, allowing them to answer at a time of their choosing, rather than being interrupted by a telephone call.

But e-mail is a written form of communication that is different from telephone voice messages and text messages. Students who text with friends have often adopted shortcuts, such as not spelling out full words, ignoring capitalization and punctuation, and not bothering with grammar or full sentence constructions. This is inappropriate in an e-mail message to an instructor, who expects a more professional quality of writing. Most instructors expect your communications to be in full sentences with correctly spelled words and reasonable grammar. Follow these guidelines:

  • Use a professional e-mail name. If you have a funny name you use with friends, create a different account with a professional name you use with instructors, work supervisors, and others.
  • Use the subject line to label your message effectively at a glance. “May I make an appointment?” says something; “In your office?” doesn’t.
  • Address e-mail messages as you do a letter, beginning “Dear Professor ____.” Include your full name if it’s not easily recognizable in your e-mail account.
  • Get to your point quickly and concisely. Don’t make the reader scroll down a long e-mail to see what it is you want to say.
  • Because e-mail is a written communication, it does not express emotion the way a voice message does. Don’t attempt to be funny, ironic, or sarcastic, Write as you would in a paper for class. In a large lecture class or an online course, your e-mail voice may be the primary way your instructor knows you, and emotionally charged messages can be confusing or give a poor impression.
  • Don’t use capital letters to emphasize. All caps look like SHOUTING.
  • Avoid abbreviations, nonstandard spelling, slang, and emoticons like smiley faces. These do not convey a professional tone.
  • Don’t make demands or state expectations such as “I’ll expect to hear from you soon” or “If I haven’t heard by 4 p.m., I’ll assume you’ll accept my paper late.”
  • When you reply to a message, leave the original message within yours. Your reader may need to recall what he or she said in the original message.
  • Be polite. End the message with a “Thank you” or something similar.
  • Proofread your message before sending it.
  • With any important message to a work supervisor or instructor, it’s a good idea to wait and review the message later before sending it. You may have expressed an emotion or thought that you will think better about later. Many problems have resulted when people sent messages too quickly without thinking.

Resolving a Problem with an Instructor

The most common issue students feel with an instructor involves receiving a grade lower than they think they deserve—especially new students not yet used to the higher standards of university. It’s depressing to get a low grade, but it’s not the end of the world. Don’t be too hard on yourself—or on the instructor. Take a good look at what happened on the test or paper and make sure you know what to do better next time. Review the earlier chapters on studying habits, time management, and taking tests.

If you genuinely believe you deserved a higher grade, you can talk with your instructor. How you communicate in that conversation, however, is very important. Instructors are used to hearing students complain about grades and patiently explaining their standards for grading. Most instructors seldom change grades. Yet it can still be worthwhile to talk with the instructor because of what you will learn from the experience.

Follow these guidelines to talk about a grade or resolve any other problem or disagreement with an instructor:

  • First go over the requirements for the paper or test and the instructor’s comments. Be sure you actually have a reason for discussing the grade—not just that you didn’t do well. Be prepared with specific points you want to go over.
  • Make an appointment with your instructor during office hours or another time. Don’t try to talk about this before or after class or with e-mail or the telephone.
  • Begin by politely explaining that you thought you did better on the assignment or test (not simply that you think you deserve a better grade) and that you’d like to go over it to better understand the result.
  • Allow the instructor to explain his or her comments on the assignment or grading of the test. Don’t complain or whine; instead, show your appreciation for the explanation. Raise any specific questions or make comments at this time. For example, you might say, “I really thought I was being clear here when I wrote.…”
  • Use good listening skills. Whatever you do, don’t argue!
  • Ask what you can do to improve your grade, if possible. Can you rewrite the paper or do any extra-credit work to help make up for a test score? While you are showing that you would like to earn a higher grade in the course, also make it clear that you’re willing to put in the effort and that you want to learn more, not just get the higher grade.
  • If there is no opportunity to improve on this specific project, ask the instructor for advice on what you might do on the next assignment or when preparing for the next test. You may be offered some individual help or receive good study advice, and your instructor will respect your willingness to make the effort as long as it’s clear that you’re more interested in learning than simply getting the grade.
7.3 Communicating with Instructors – University Success (2)

Tips for Success: Talking with Instructors

  • When you have a question, ask it sooner rather than later.
  • Be prepared and plan your questions and comments in advance.
  • Be respectful but personable and communicate professionally.
  • Be open minded and ready to learn. Avoid whining and complaining.
  • There is no such thing as a “stupid question.”

Controlling Anger over Grades

If you’re going to talk with an instructor about your grade or any other problem, control any anger you may be feeling. Here are a few tips to help you control your anger before you do or say something that you might later regret:

  • Being upset about a grade is good because it shows you care and that you have passion about your education. But anger prevents clear thinking, so rein it in first.
  • Since anger involves bodily reactions, physical actions can help you control anger: try some deep breathing first.
  • Try putting yourself in your instructor’s shoes and seeing the situation from their point of view. Try to understand how grading is not a personal issue of “liking” you—that they are really doing something for your educational benefit.
  • It’s not your life that’s being graded. Things outside your control can result in not doing well on a test or assignment, but the instructor can grade only on what you actually did on that test or assignment—not what you could have done or are capable of doing. Understanding this can help you accept what happened and not take a grade personally.
(Video) How to Speak

Finding a Mentor

A mentor is someone who is usually older and more experienced than you who becomes your trusted guide, advisor, and role model. A mentor is someone you may want to be like in your future career or profession—someone you look up to and whose advice and guidance you respect. Some universities have formal systems to help you find an appropriate mentor. Ask at our student services office to see if there is a program available to you.

Finding a mentor can be one of the most fulfilling aspects of university. As a student, you think about many things and make many decisions, large and small, almost daily: What do you want to do in the future? How can you best balance your studies with your job? What should you major in? Should you take this course or that one? What should you do if you feel like you’re failing a course? Where should you put your priorities as you prepare for a future career? How can you be a better student? The questions go on and on. We talk about things like this with our friends and often family members, but often they don’t have the same experience or background to help us as a mentor can.

Most important, a mentor is someone who is willing to help you, to talk with you about decisions you face, to support you when things become difficult, and to guide you when you’re feeling lost. A mentor can become a valuable part of your future network but also can help you in the here and now.

Many different people can become mentors: other students, family members, people you know through work, your boss. As a university student, however, your best mentor likely is someone involved in education: your advisor, a more experienced student, or an instructor. Finding a mentor is another reason to develop good relationships with your instructors, starting with class participation and communication outside of class.

A mentor is not like a good friend, exactly—you’re not going to invite your instructor to a movie—but it does involve a form of friendship. Nor is a mentor a formal relationship: you don’t ask an instructor to become your mentor. The mentor relationship is more informal and develops slowly, often without actively looking for a mentor. Here’s an example of how one student “found” a mentor:


As a freshman taking several classes, Miguel particularly liked and admired one of his instructors, Professor Canton. Miguel spoke up more in Canton’s class and talked with him sometimes during office hours. When it was time to register for the next term, Miguel saw that Canton was teaching another course he was interested in, so he asked him about that course one day during office hours. Miguel was pleased when Professor Canton said he’d like to have him in his class next term.
By the end of his first year of university, Miguel seemed to know Canton better than any of his other instructors and felt very comfortable talking with him outside of class. One day after talking about a reading assignment, Miguel said he was enjoying this class so much that he was thinking about majoring in this subject and asked Professor Canton what he thought about it. Canton suggested that he take a few more classes before making a decision, and he invited Miguel to sit in on a seminar of upper-level students he was holding.
In his second year, Miguel’s interests turned in another direction as he began to think about his future job possibilities, but by then he felt comfortable enough talking with Canton that he occasionally he stopped by the professor’s office even though he was not taking a class with him. Sometimes he was surprised how much Professor Canton knew about other departments and other faculty, and Canton often shared insights about other courses he might be interested in that his advisor had not directed him to. When Miguel learned about a summer internship in his field and was considering applying, Canton not only volunteered to write him a letter of recommendation but even offered to help Miguel with the essay part of the application if he wanted.

Some universities have more formal mentoring programs, and you should become involved in one if you have this opportunity, but often a mentoring relationship occurs informally as you get to know an instructor or another person over time. In your first year, you don’t go searching frantically for a mentor, but you should begin interacting with your instructors and other students in ways that may lead, over time, to developing that kind of relationship.

Similarly, your academic advisor or a university counselor might become a mentor for you if you share interests and you look up to that person as a role model and trusted guide. Your advisor is so important for your university success that if you feel you are not getting along well, you should ask the advising department to switch you to a different advisor. Take the time to build a good relationship with your advisor, the same as with instructors—following the same guidelines in this chapter for communication and interaction.

Relating to an Instructor of an Online Course

Online courses have grown tremendously in recent years, and most universities now have at least some online courses. While online learning once focused on students at a distance from campus, now many students enrolled in regular classes also take some courses online. Online courses have a number of practical benefits but also pose special issues, primarily related to how students interact with other students and the instructor.

(Video) 7.3 Live Discussion with Prof. Julius Ademokoya

Some online courses do involve “face time” or live audio connections with the instructor and other students, via Webcasts or Webinars, but many are self-paced and asynchronous, meaning that you experience the course on your own time and communicate with others via messages back and forth rather than communicating in real time. All online courses include opportunities for interacting with the instructor, typically through e-mail or a bulletin board where you may see comments and questions from other students as well.

7.3 Communicating with Instructors – University Success (3)

Many educators argue that online courses can involve more interaction between students and the instructor than in a large lecture class, not less. But two important differences affect how that interaction occurs and how successful it is for engaging students in learning. Most communication is written, with no or limited opportunity to ask questions face to face or during office hours, and students must take the initiative to interact beyond the requirements of online assignments.

Many students enjoy online courses, in part for the practical benefit of scheduling your own time. Some students who are reluctant to speak in class communicate more easily in writing. But other students may have less confidence in their writing skills or may never initiate interaction at all and end up feeling lost. Depending on your learning style, an online course may feel natural to you (if you learn well independently and through language skills) or more difficult (if you are a more visual or kinesthetic learner). Online courses have higher drop-out and failure rates due to some students feeling isolated and unmotivated.

Success in an online course requires commitment and motivation. Follow these guidelines:

  • Make sure you have the technology. If you’re not comfortable reading and writing on a computer, don’t rush into an online course. If you have limited access to a computer or high-speed Internet connection, or have to arrange your schedule to use a computer elsewhere, you may have difficulty with the course.
  • Accept that you’ll have to motivate yourself and take responsibility for your learning. It’s actually harder for some people to sit down at the computer on their own than to show up at a set time. Be sure you have enough time in your week for all course activities and try to schedule regular times online and for assignments. Evaluate the course requirements carefully before signing up.
  • Work on your writing skills. If you are not comfortable writing, you may want to defer taking online courses until you have had more experience with university-level writing. When communicating with the instructor of an online course, follow the guidelines for effective e-mail outlined earlier.
  • Use critical thinking skills. Most online courses involve assignments requiring problem solving and critical thinking. It’s not as simple as watching video lectures and taking multiple-choice tests. You need to actively engage with the course material.
  • Take the initiative to ask questions and seek help. Remember, your instructor can’t see you to know if you’re confused or feeling frustrated understanding a lecture or reading. You must take the first step to communicate your questions.
  • Be patient. When you ask a question or seek help with an assignment, you have to wait for a reply from your instructor. You may need to continue with a reading or writing assignment before you receive a reply. If the instructor is online at scheduled times for direct contact, take advantage of those times for immediate feedback and answers.
  • Use any opportunity to interact with other students in the course. If you can interact with other students online, do it. Ask questions of other students and monitor their communications. If you know another person taking the same course, try to synchronize your schedules so that you can study together and talk over assignments. Students who feel they are part of a learning community always do better than those who feel isolated and on their own.

Key Takeaways

  • Additional benefits of getting to know and networking with instructors include receiving references and academic advice.
  • Interacting with university instructors contributes to the growth and intellectual maturity that are part of what it means to be “educated.”
  • Prepare in advance before meeting with an instructor and communicate respectfully, honestly, and sincerely. Your efforts will be repaid.
  • It is especially important for part-time and nontraditional students to make the effort to interact with instructors.
  • Follow accepted guidelines for professional use of e-mail with instructors.
  • It is worthwhile speaking with an instructor when you disagree about a grade because of what you will learn in this interaction.
  • Finding a mentor can be one of the most fulfilling experiences in university. Getting to know your instructors may be the first step toward find a mentor.
  • Online courses involve special issues for effective learning, but you must make the effort to interact with the instructor and other students in a way that encourages your success.

Checkpoint Exercises

  1. Name three benefits you might gain from talking with an instructor weeks or months after the course has ended.

    __________________________________________________________________

    __________________________________________________________________

    __________________________________________________________________

    (Video) AE Live 7.5 - Teachers Working Together: A Successful Community of Practice

  2. What should you do before going to see your instructor during office hours?

    __________________________________________________________________

    __________________________________________________________________

  3. For each of the following statements, circle T for true or F for false:

    TFThe instructor of a large lecture course will recognize you even if you sit in the back and try not to be noticed.
    TFInstructors appreciate it when you talk to them in the kind of language you use with your best friends.
    TFWhining and complaining is the best way to convince an instructor to change your grade.
    TFIt is acceptable to ask an instructor if you can rewrite a paper or do extra-credit work to help make up for a poor grade.
  4. Write an appropriate opening for an e-mail to an instructor.

    __________________________________________________________________

  5. Think for a few minutes about all the past instructors you have had. Would you like to get to know any one of them better, perhaps as a mentor? What personality traits does this person have that would make him or her your ideal mentor? (If no instructor you have met so far is your idea of a perfect mentor, write down the traits you hope to find in an instructor in the future.)

    __________________________________________________________________

    __________________________________________________________________

    __________________________________________________________________

FAQs

How do you communicate with your instructors? ›

Four Ways to Communicate with Your Instructor
  1. EMAIL. Email is the best way to communicate with your college instructors. ...
  2. CANVAS EMAIL. Canvas, SFCC's learning management system, includes an email feature, so you can do all your schoolwork and communication in one place. ...
  3. SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECT MESSAGE. ...
  4. OFFICE HOURS.
Sep 25, 2020

Which is the best advice for communicating with your instructors? ›

Guidelines for Communicating with Instructors
  • Prepare before going to the instructor's office. ...
  • Don't forget to introduce yourself. ...
  • Respect the instructor's time. ...
  • Realize that the instructor will recognize you from class—even in a large lecture hall. ...
  • Don't try to fool an instructor.

What are the most effective ways to communicate with college students? ›

Email is preferred early on

It may come as a surprise, but email remains to be prospective students' preferred method of communication from colleges and universities. The survey found that prospective students prefer less intrusive communication methods early on in their search, including email.

Why is it important to communicate with instructors? ›

Communicating with instructors can help you feel more comfortable in college and more connected to the college culture. Students who communicate with their instructors are less likely to become dispirited and drop out. Communicating with instructors is also a valuable way to learn about an academic field or a career.

What are three benefits of speaking with your professors? ›

Below are a few reasons why talking to your professor can be beneficial for you.
  • Better Grades. Nothing is better than getting straight A's! ...
  • Life Advice. We could all use a little life advice here and there. ...
  • Research Projects. ...
  • Letters of Recommendations.
Jun 15, 2018

What is the most common conflict that students experience with college instructors? ›

Learning Objectives. The most common “conflict” that students experience with instructors is feeling that they've received a lower grade than they deserve. This may be especially true for new students not yet used to the higher standards of college.

What to talk about with professors? ›

Make an appointment with your professor to talk generally about your job hopes or options as well as what connections your professor might know about. You never know what former students they still keep in touch with, what organizations they volunteer with, or what other connections they may have to offer.

How do I get closer to my professor? ›

How To Build A Strong Relationship With Your Professor
  1. Introduce Yourself After the First Class. ...
  2. Look Up Your Professor Online. ...
  3. Make Participation a Priority. ...
  4. Be Courteous and Respectful. ...
  5. Attend 2-3 Office Hours. ...
  6. Make Sure They Understand Your Professional Goals. ...
  7. Get A Good Grade In The Class.
May 31, 2022

What are the ways to improve communication in the academic institution? ›

Communicating with students, staff, and alumni is a daily task for many at higher education institutions.
...
6 Ways to Improve Communications at Higher Education Institutions
  1. Be consistent. ...
  2. Reach out more often. ...
  3. Make it personal. ...
  4. Build trusted relationships. ...
  5. Build connections. ...
  6. Make it rewarding.
Nov 4, 2021

What is the most preferred communication message of undergraduate students? ›

Despite this, surveyed students ranked email as their most preferred method of communication.

How can you improve communication at school? ›

5 Ways to Establish Effective Communication in the Classroom
  1. Create a safe environment.
  2. Encourage teamwork.
  3. Don't stand at the front of the classroom.
  4. Use some active listening exercises.
  5. Be sure to give positive feedback.
Jan 10, 2022

How do I communicate with my instructor and other classmates? ›

It may feel awkward to talk with your instructors this way, but don't worry.
...
Netiquette
  1. Include a subject line. ...
  2. Avoid sarcasm. ...
  3. Acknowledge and return messages promptly. ...
  4. Use appropriate language. ...
  5. Use appropriate intensifiers to help convey meaning.

How do you communicate with lecturers? ›

communication with professors much easier.
  1. Remember Their Preferred Channel of Communication. ...
  2. Schedule an Appointment. ...
  3. Introduce Yourself. ...
  4. Be Ready for a Small Talk. ...
  5. Understand the Purpose of Your Visit. ...
  6. Make Sure You Have Everything You Might Need With You. ...
  7. Remember That a Professor Is a Person Too.

How do you communicate with your classmates? ›

Tips For Students: How To Connect With Classmates
  1. Join the community of students. ...
  2. Attend events regularly. ...
  3. Begin a study group. ...
  4. Introduce yourself to everyone. ...
  5. Add the classmates on social media. ...
  6. Become a volunteer. ...
  7. Participate in discussions.
Sep 26, 2018

What are some of the guidelines for online students to remember while communicating with their instructors? ›

What are some of the guidelines for online students to remember while communicating with their instructors? Be professional and respectful. Write clear and concise emails. Respond promptly and appropriately.

So far we’ve been looking at class participation and general interaction with both instructors and other students in class. In addition to this, students gain very specific benefits from communicating directly with their instructors. Learn best practices for communicating with your instructors during office hours and through e-mail.

University students are sometimes surprised to discover that instructors like students and enjoy getting to know them.. To earn your instructor’s respect, come to class prepared, do the work, participate genuinely in class, and show respect—and the instructor will be happy to see you when you come to office hours or need some extra help.. Sometimes an older student feels a little out of place and may even feel “the system” is designed for younger students; this attitude can lead to a hesitation to participate in class or see an instructor during office hours.. Instructors enjoy talking with older and other nontraditional students—even when, as sometimes happens, a student is older than the instructor.. Some older university students may not yet understand the importance of e-mail and other computer skills in university; if you are not now using e-mail, it’s time to learn how (see “Getting Started with E-mail”).. Especially when it is difficult to see an instructor in person during office hours, e-mail can be an effective form of communication and interaction with instructors.. The most common issue students feel with an instructor involves receiving a grade lower than they think they deserve—especially new students not yet used to the higher standards of university.. As a university student, however, your best mentor likely is someone involved in education: your advisor, a more experienced student, or an instructor.. Online courses have a number of practical benefits but also pose special issues, primarily related to how students interact with other students and the instructor.. Some online courses do involve “face time” or live audio connections with the instructor and other students, via Webcasts or Webinars, but many are self-paced and asynchronous, meaning that you experience the course on your own time and communicate with others via messages back and forth rather than communicating in real time.. Interacting with university instructors contributes to the growth and intellectual maturity that are part of what it means to be “educated.” Prepare in advance before meeting with an instructor and communicate respectfully, honestly, and sincerely.. Online courses involve special issues for effective learning, but you must make the effort to interact with the instructor and other students in a way that encourages your success.. (If no instructor you have met so far is your idea of a perfect mentor, write down the traits you hope to find in an instructor in the future.)

So far we’ve been looking at class participation and general interaction with both instructors and other students in class. In addition to this, students gain very specific benefits from communicating directly with their instructors. Learn best practices for communicating with your instructors during office hours and through e-mail.

To earn your instructor’s respect, come to class prepared, do the work, participate genuinely in class, and show respect—and the instructor will be happy to see you when you come to office hours or need some extra help.. Sometimes an older student feels a little out of place and may even feel “the system” is designed for younger students; this attitude can lead to a hesitation to participate in class or see an instructor during office hours.. Instructors enjoy talking with older and other nontraditional students—even when, as sometimes happens, a student is older than the instructor.. Some older college students may not yet understand the importance of e-mail and other computer skills in college; if you are not now using e-mail, it’s time to learn how (see “Getting Started with E-mail”).. Especially when it is difficult to see an instructor in person during office hours, e-mail can be an effective form of communication and interaction with instructors.. The most common issue students feel with an instructor involves receiving a grade lower than they think they deserve—especially new students not yet used to the higher standards of college.. As a college student, however, your best mentor likely is someone involved in education: your advisor, a more experienced student, or an instructor.. Online courses have a number of practical benefits but also pose special issues, primarily related to how students interact with other students and the instructor.. Some online courses do involve “face time” or live audio connections with the instructor and other students, via Webcasts or Webinars, but many are self-paced and asynchronous, meaning that you experience the course on your own time and communicate with others via messages back and forth rather than communicating in real time.. All online courses include opportunities for interacting with the instructor, typically through e-mail or a bulletin board where you may see comments and questions from other students as well.. Interacting with college instructors contributes to the growth and intellectual maturity that are part of what it means to be “educated.” Prepare in advance before meeting with an instructor and communicate respectfully, honestly, and sincerely.. Online courses involve special issues for effective learning, but you must make the effort to interact with the instructor and other students in a way that encourages your success.. (If no instructor you have met so far is your idea of a perfect mentor, write down the traits you hope to find in an instructor in the future.)

Previous Section Table of Contents Next Section  7.3 Communicating with InstructorsLearning Objectives1.Describe additional benefits for interacting with your instructor beyond the value for that particular course.2.List guidelines for successfully communicating individually with an instructor, such as doing so during office hours.3.Write e-mail messages to instructors and others that are polite, professional, and effective.4.Know how to graciously resolve a problem, such as a grade dispute, with an instructor.5.Understand the value of having a mentor and how interactions with instructors, your academic advisor, and others may lead to a mentoring relationship.6.Explain what is needed to succeed in an online course and how to interact with an online instructor.So far we’ve been looking at class participation and general interaction with both instructors and other students in class. In addition to this, students gain very specific benefits from communicating directly with their instructors. Learn best practices for communicating with your instructors during office hours and through e-mail.Additional Benefits of Talking with Your InstructorsCollege students are sometimes surprised to discover that instructors like students and enjoy getting to know them. After all, they want to feel they’re doing something more meaningful than talking to an empty room. The human dimension of college really matters, and as a student you are an important part of your instructor’s world. Most instructors are happy to see you during their office hours or to talk a few minutes after class.This chapter has repeatedly emphasized how active participation in learning is a key to student success. In addition, talking with your instructors often leads to benefits beyond simply doing well in that class.•Talking with instructors helps you feel more comfortable in college and more connected to the campus. Students who talk to their instructors are less likely to become disillusioned and drop out.•Talking with instructors is a valuable way to learn about an academic field or a career. Don’t know for sure what you want to major in, or what people with a degree in your chosen major actually do after college? Most instructors will share information and insights with you.•You may need a reference or letter of recommendation for a job or internship application. Getting to know some of your instructors puts you in an ideal position to ask for a letter of recommendation or a reference in the future when you need one.•Because instructors are often well connected within their field, they may know of a job, internship, or research possibility you otherwise may not learn about. An instructor who knows you is a valuable part of your network. NetworkingThe process of engaging others in helping reach an objective. is very important for future job searches and other opportunities. In fact, most jobs are found through networking, not through classified ads or online job postings.•Think about what it truly means to be “educated”: how one thinks, understands society and the world, and responds to problems and new situations. Much of this learning occurs outside the classroom. Talking with your highly educated instructors can be among your most meaningful experiences in college.Guidelines for Communicating with InstructorsGetting along with instructors and communicating well begins with attitude. As experts in their field, they deserve your respect. Remember that a college education is a collaborative process that works best when students and instructors communicate freely in an exchange of ideas, information, and perspectives. So while you should respect your instructors, you shouldn’t fear them. As you get to know them better, you’ll learn their personalities and find appropriate ways to communicate. Here are some guidelines for getting along with and communicating with your instructors:Figure 7.5 Your instructor can often help explain course topics.© Thinkstock•Prepare before going to the instructor’s office. Go over your notes on readings and lectures and write down your specific questions. You’ll feel more comfortable, and the instructor will appreciate your being organized.•Don’t forget to introduce yourself. Especially near the beginning of the term, don’t assume your instructor has learned everyone’s names yet and don’t make him or her have to ask you. Unless the instructor has already asked you to address him or her as “Dr. ____,” “Ms. _____” or Mr. _______,” or something similar, it’s appropriate to say “Professor _______.”•Respect the instructor’s time. In addition to teaching, college instructors sit on committees, do research and other professional work, and have personal lives. Don’t show up two minutes before the end of an office hour and expect the instructor to stay late to talk with you.•Realize that the instructor will recognize you from class—even in a large lecture hall. If you spent a lecture class joking around with friends in the back row, don’t think you can show up during office hours to find out what you missed while you weren’t paying attention.•Don’t try to fool an instructor. Insincere praise or making excuses for not doing an assignment won’t make it in college. Nor is it a good idea to show you’re “too cool” to take all this seriously—another attitude sure to turn off an instructor. To earn your instructor’s respect, come to class prepared, do the work, participate genuinely in class, and show respect—and the instructor will be happy to see you when you come to office hours or need some extra help.•Try to see things from the instructor’s point of view. Imagine that you spent a couple hours making PowerPoint slides and preparing a class lecture on something you find very stimulating and exciting. Standing in front of a full room, you are gratified to see faces smiling and heads nodding as people understand what you’re saying—they really get it! And then a student after class asks, “Is this going to be on the test?” How would you feel?•Be professional when talking to an instructor. You can be cordial and friendly, but keep it professional and on an adult level. Come to office hours prepared with your questions—not just to chat or joke around. (Don’t wear sunglasses or earphones in the office or check your cell phone for messages.) Be prepared to accept criticism in a professional way, without taking it personally or complaining.•Use your best communication skills. In Chapter 9 "The Social World of College", you’ll learn the difference between assertive communication and passive or aggressive communication.Part-Time and Returning StudentsStudents who are working and who have their own families and other responsibilities may have special issues interacting with instructors. Sometimes an older student feels a little out of place and may even feel “the system” is designed for younger students; this attitude can lead to a hesitation to participate in class or see an instructor during office hours.But participation and communication with instructors is very important for all students—and may be even more important for “nontraditional” students. Getting to know your instructors is particularly crucial for feeling at home in college. Instructors enjoy talking with older and other nontraditional students—even when, as sometimes happens, a student is older than the instructor. Nontraditional students are often highly motivated and eager to learn. If you can’t make the instructor’s office hours because of your work schedule, ask for an appointment at a different time—your needs will be respected.Part-time students, especially in community colleges where they may be taking evening courses, often have greater difficulty meeting with instructors. In addition, many part-time students taking evening and weekend classes are taught by part-time faculty who, like them, may be on campus only small amounts of time. Yet it is just as critical for part-time students to engage in the learning process and have a sense of belonging on campus. With effort, you can usually find a way to talk with your instructors. Don’t hesitate to ask for an appointment at another time or to meet with your instructor over a cup of coffee after class before driving home. Assert yourself: You are in college for reasons just as good as those of other students, and you have the same rights. Avoid the temptation to give up or feel defeated; talk with your instructor to arrange a time to meet, and make the most of your time interacting together. Use e-mail to communicate when you need to and contact your instructor when you have any question you can’t raise in person.E-mail Best PracticesJust as e-mail has become a primary form of communication in business and society, e-mail has a growing role in education and has become an important and valuable means of communicating with instructors. Virtually all younger college students have grown up using e-mail and have a computer or computer access in college, although some have developed poor habits from using e-mail principally with friends in the past. Some older college students may not yet understand the importance of e-mail and other computer skills in college; if you are not now using e-mail, it’s time to learn how (see “Getting Started with E-mail”). Especially when it is difficult to see an instructor in person during office hours, e-mail can be an effective form of communication and interaction with instructors. E-mail is also an increasingly effective way to collaborate with other students on group projects or while studying with other students.Getting Started with E-mail•If you don’t have your own computer, find out where on-campus computers are available for student use, such as at the library or student center.•You can set up a free Web-based e-mail account at Google, Yahoo! or other sites. These allow you to send and receive e-mail from any computer that is connected to the Internet.•If you don’t have enough computer experience to know how to do this, ask a friend for help getting started or check at your library or student services office for a publication explaining how e-mail works.•Once you have your account set up, give your e-mail address to instructors who request it and to other students with whom you study or maintain contact. E-mail is a good way to contact another student if you miss a class.•Once you begin using e-mail, remember to check it regularly for messages. Most people view e-mail like a telephone message and expect you to respond fairly soon.•Be sure to use good e-mail etiquette when writing to instructors.If your instructor gives you his or her e-mail addresses, use e-mail rather than the telephone for nonurgent matters. Using e-mail respects other people’s time, allowing them to answer at a time of their choosing, rather than being interrupted by a telephone call.But e-mail is a written form of communication that is different from telephone voice messages and text messages. Students who text with friends have often adopted shortcuts, such as not spelling out full words, ignoring capitalization and punctuation, and not bothering with grammar or full sentence constructions. This is inappropriate in an e-mail message to an instructor, who expects a more professional quality of writing. Most instructors expect your communications to be in full sentences with correctly spelled words and reasonable grammar. Follow these guidelines:•Use a professional e-mail name. If you have a funny name you use with friends, create a different account with a professional name you use with instructors, work supervisors, and others.•Use the subject line to label your message effectively at a glance. “May I make an appointment?” says something; “In your office?” doesn’t.•Address e-mail messages as you do a letter, beginning “Dear Professor ____.” Include your full name if it’s not easily recognizable in your e-mail account.•Get to your point quickly and concisely. Don’t make the reader scroll down a long e-mail to see what it is you want to say.•Because e-mail is a written communication, it does not express emotion the way a voice message does. Don’t attempt to be funny, ironic, or sarcastic, Write as you would in a paper for class. In a large lecture class or an online course, your e-mail voice may be the primary way your instructor knows you, and emotionally charged messages can be confusing or give a poor impression.•Don’t use capital letters to emphasize. All caps look like SHOUTING.•Avoid abbreviations, nonstandard spelling, slang, and emoticons like smiley faces. These do not convey a professional tone.•Don’t make demands or state expectations such as “I’ll expect to hear from you soon” or “If I haven’t heard by 4 p.m., I’ll assume you’ll accept my paper late.”•When you reply to a message, leave the original message within yours. Your reader may need to recall what he or she said in the original message.•Be polite. End the message with a “Thank you” or something similar.•Proofread your message before sending it.•With any important message to a work supervisor or instructor, it’s a good idea to wait and review the message later before sending it. You may have expressed an emotion or thought that you will think better about later. Many problems have resulted when people sent messages too quickly without thinking.Resolving a Problem with an InstructorThe most common issue students feel with an instructor involves receiving a grade lower than they think they deserve—especially new students not yet used to the higher standards of college. It’s depressing to get a low grade, but it’s not the end of the world. Don’t be too hard on yourself—or on the instructor. Take a good look at what happened on the test or paper and make sure you know what to do better next time. Review the earlier chapters on studying habits, time management, and taking tests.If you genuinely believe you deserved a higher grade, you can talk with your instructor. How you communicate in that conversation, however, is very important. Instructors are used to hearing students complain about grades and patiently explaining their standards for grading. Most instructors seldom change grades. Yet it can still be worthwhile to talk with the instructor because of what you will learn from the experience.Follow these guidelines to talk about a grade or resolve any other problem or disagreement with an instructor:•First go over the requirements for the paper or test and the instructor’s comments. Be sure you actually have a reason for discussing the grade—not just that you didn’t do well. Be prepared with specific points you want to go over.•Make an appointment with your instructor during office hours or another time. Don’t try to talk about this before or after class or with e-mail or the telephone.•Begin by politely explaining that you thought you did better on the assignment or test (not simply that you think you deserve a better grade) and that you’d like to go over it to better understand the result.•Allow the instructor to explain his or her comments on the assignment or grading of the test. Don’t complain or whine; instead, show your appreciation for the explanation. Raise any specific questions or make comments at this time. For example, you might say, “I really thought I was being clear here when I wrote.…”•Use good listening skills. Whatever you do, don’t argue!•Ask what you can do to improve grade, if possible. Can you rewrite the paper or do any extra-credit work to help make up for a test score? While you are showing that you would like to earn a higher grade in the course, also make it clear that you’re willing to put in the effort and that you want to learn more, not just get the higher grade.•If there is no opportunity to improve on this specific project, ask the instructor for advice on what you might do on the next assignment or when preparing for the next test. You may be offered some individual help or receive good study advice, and your instructor will respect your willingness to make the effort as long as it’s clear that you’re more interested in learning than simply getting the grade.Tips for Success: Talking with Instructors•When you have a question, ask it sooner rather than later.•Be prepared and plan your questions and comments in advance.•Be respectful but personable and communicate professionally.•Be open minded and ready to learn. Avoid whining and complaining.•There is no such thing as a “stupid question.”Controlling Anger over GradesIf you’re going to talk with an instructor about your grade or any other problem, control any anger you may be feeling. The GPS LifePlan project of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities System offers some insights into this process:•Being upset about a grade is good because it shows you care and that you have passion about your education. But anger prevents clear thinking, so rein it in first.•Since anger involves bodily reactions, physical actions can help you control anger: try some deep breathing first.•Try putting yourself in your instructor’s shoes and seeing the situation from their point of view. Try to understand how grading is not a personal issue of “liking” you—that they are really doing something for your educational benefit.•It’s not your life that’s being graded. Things outside your control can result in not doing well on a test or assignment, but the instructor can grade only on what you actually did on that test or assignment—not what you could have done or are capable of doing. Understanding this can help you accept what happened and not take a grade personally.Adapted from “How to Communicate and Problem Solve with Your Instructor,” http://www.gpslifeplan.org/generic/pdf/how-to-communicate-with-professor.pdf (accessed December 27, 2009). Finding a MentorA mentorA trusted individual, often an older and wiser role model, who provides guidance and advice. is someone who is usually older and more experienced than you who becomes your trusted guide, advisor, and role model. A mentor is someone you may want to be like in your future career or profession—someone you look up to and whose advice and guidance you respect.Finding a mentor can be one of the most fulfilling aspects of college. As a student, you think about many things and make many decisions, large and small, almost daily: What do you want to do in the future? How can you best balance your studies with your job? What should you major in? Should you take this course or that one? What should you do if you feel like you’re failing a course? Where should you put your priorities as you prepare for a future career? How can you be a better student? The questions go on and on. We talk about things like this with our friends and often family members, but often they don’t have the same experience or background to help us as a mentor can.Most important, a mentor is someone who is willing to help you, to talk with you about decisions you face, to support you when things become difficult, and to guide you when you’re feeling lost. A mentor can become a valuable part of your future network but also can help you in the here and now.Many different people can become mentors: other students, family members, people you know through work, your boss. As a college student, however, your best mentor likely is someone involved in education: your advisor, a more experienced student, or an instructor. Finding a mentor is another reason to develop good relationships with your instructors, starting with class participation and communication outside of class.A mentor is not like a good friend, exactly—you’re not going to invite your instructor to a movie—but it does involve a form of friendship. Nor is a mentor a formal relationship: you don’t ask an instructor to become your mentor. The mentor relationship is more informal and develops slowly, often without actively looking for a mentor. Here’s an example of how one student “found” a mentor:As a freshman taking several classes, Miguel particularly liked and admired one of his instructors, Professor Canton. Miguel spoke up more in Canton’s class and talked with him sometimes during office hours. When it was time to register for the next term, Miguel saw that Canton was teaching another course he was interested in, so he asked him about that course one day during office hours. Miguel was pleased when Professor Canton said he’d like to have him in his class next term.By the end of his first year of college, Miguel seemed to know Canton better than any of his other instructors and felt very comfortable talking with him outside of class. One day after talking about a reading assignment, Miguel said he was enjoying this class so much that he was thinking about majoring in this subject and asked Professor Canton what he thought about it. Canton suggested that he take a few more classes before making a decision, and he invited Miguel to sit in on a seminar of upper-level students he was holding.In his second year, Miguel’s interests turned in another direction as he began to think about his future job possibilities, but by then he felt comfortable enough talking with Canton that he occasionally he stopped by the professor’s office even though he was not taking a class with him. Sometimes he was surprised how much Professor Canton knew about other departments and other faculty, and Canton often shared insights about other courses he might be interested in that his advisor had not directed him to. When Miguel learned about a summer internship in his field and was considering applying, Canton not only volunteered to write him a letter of recommendation but even offered to help Miguel with the essay part of the application if he wanted. Some colleges have more formal mentoring programs, and you should become involved in one if you have this opportunity, but often a mentoring relationship occurs informally as you get to know an instructor or another person over time. In your first year, you don’t go searching frantically for a mentor, but you should begin interacting with your instructors and other students in ways that may lead, over time, to developing that kind of relationship.Similarly, your academic advisor or a college counselor might become a mentor for you if you share interests and you look up to that person as a role model and trusted guide. Your advisor is so important for your college success that if you feel you are not getting along well, you should ask the advising department to switch you to a different advisor. Take the time to build a good relationship with your advisor, the same as with instructors—following the same guidelines in this chapter for communication and interaction.Relating to an Instructor of an Online CourseOnline courses have grown tremendously in recent years, and most colleges now have at least some online courses. While online learning once focused on students at a distance from campus, now many students enrolled in regular classes also take some courses online. Online courses have a number of practical benefits but also pose special issues, primarily related to how students interact with other students and the instructor.Some online courses do involve “face time” or live audio connections with the instructor and other students, via Webcasts or Webinars, but many are self-paced and asynchronous, meaning that you experience the course on your own time and communicate with others via messages back and forth rather than communicating in real time. All online courses include opportunities for interacting with the instructor, typically through e-mail or a bulletin board where you may see comments and questions from other students as well.Figure 7.6 Online courses let you study when you want, where you want.© ThinkstockMany educators argue that online courses can involve more interaction between students and the instructor than in a large lecture class, not less. But two important differences affect how that interaction occurs and how successful it is for engaging students in learning. Most communication is written, with no or limited opportunity to ask questions face to face or during office hours, and students must take the initiative to interact beyond the requirements of online assignments.Many students enjoy online courses, in part for the practical benefit of scheduling your own time. Some students who are reluctant to speak in class communicate more easily in writing. But other students may have less confidence in their writing skills or may never initiate interaction at all and end up feeling lost. Depending on your learning style, an online course may feel natural to you (if you learn well independently and through language skills) or more difficult (if you are a more visual or kinesthetic learner). Online courses have higher drop-out and failure rates due to some students feeling isolated and unmotivated.Success in an online course requires commitment and motivation. Follow these guidelines:•Make sure you have the technology. If you’re not comfortable reading and writing on a computer, don’t rush into an online course. If you have limited access to a computer or high-speed Internet connection, or have to arrange your schedule to use a computer elsewhere, you may have difficulty with the course.•Accept that you’ll have to motivate yourself and take responsibility for your learning. It’s actually harder for some people to sit down at the computer on their own than to show up at a set time. Be sure you have enough time in your week for all course activities and try to schedule regular times online and for assignments. Evaluate the course requirements carefully before signing up.•Work on your writing skills. If you are not comfortable writing, you may want to defer taking online courses until you have had more experience with college-level writing. When communicating with the instructor of an online course, follow the guidelines for effective e-mail outlined earlier.•Use critical thinking skills. Most online courses involve assignments requiring problem solving and critical thinking. It’s not as simple as watching video lectures and taking multiple-choice tests. You need to actively engage with the course material.•Take the initiative to ask questions and seek help. Remember, your instructor can’t see you to know if you’re confused or feeling frustrated understanding a lecture or reading. You must take the first step to communicate your questions.•Be patient. When you ask a question or seek help with an assignment, you have to wait for a reply from your instructor. You may need to continue with a reading or writing assignment before you receive a reply. If the instructor is online at scheduled times for direct contact, take advantage of those times for immediate feedback and answers.•Use any opportunity to interact with other students in the course. If you can interact with other students online, do it. Ask questions of other students and monitor their communications. If you know another person taking the same course, try to synchronize your schedules so that you can study together and talk over assignments. Students who feel they are part of a learning community always do better than those who feel isolated and on their own.Key Takeaways•Additional benefits of getting to know and networking with instructors include receiving references and academic advice.•Interacting with college instructors contributes to the growth and intellectual maturity that are part of what it means to be “educated.”•Prepare in advance before meeting with an instructor and communicate respectfully, honestly, and sincerely. Your efforts will be repaid.•It is especially important for part-time and nontraditional students to make the effort to interact with instructors.•Follow accepted guidelines for professional use of e-mail with instructors.•It is worthwhile speaking with an instructor when you disagree about a grade because of what you will learn in this interaction.•Finding a mentor can be one of the most fulfilling experiences in college. Getting to know your instructors may be the first step toward find a mentor.•Online courses involve special issues for effective learning, but you must make the effort to interact with the instructor and other students in a way that encourages your success.Checkpoint Exercises1.Name three benefits you might gain from talking with an instructor weeks or months after the course has ended.______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________2.What should you do before going to see your instructor during office hours?____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________3.For each of the following statements, circle T for true or F for false:T F The instructor of a large lecture course will recognize you even if you sit in the back and try not to be noticed. T F Instructors appreciate it when you talk to them in the kind of language you use with your best friends. T F Whining and complaining is the best way to convince an instructor to change your grade. T F It is acceptable to ask an instructor if you can rewrite a paper or do extra-credit work to help make up for a poor grade. 4.Write an appropriate opening for an e-mail to an instructor.__________________________________________________________________5.Think for a few minutes about all the past instructors you have had. Would you like to get to know any one of them better, perhaps as a mentor? What personality traits does this person have that would make him or her your ideal mentor? (If no instructor you have met so far is your idea of a perfect mentor, write down the traits you hope to find in an instructor in the future.)______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Previous Section Table of Contents Next Section

Learning Objectives1.Describe additional benefits for interacting with your instructor beyond the value for that particular course.2.List guidelines for successfully communicating individually with an instructor, such as doing so during office hours.3.Write e-mail messages to instructors and others that are polite, professional, and effective.4.Know how to graciously resolve a problem, such as a grade dispute, with an instructor.5.Understand the value of having a mentor and how interactions with instructors, your academic advisor, and others may lead to a mentoring relationship.6.Explain what is needed to succeed in an online course and how to interact with an online instructor.. To earn your instructor’s respect, come to class prepared, do the work, participate genuinely in class, and show respect—and the instructor will be happy to see you when you come to office hours or need some extra help.•Try to see things from the instructor’s point of view.. These allow you to send and receive e-mail from any computer that is connected to the Internet.•If you don’t have enough computer experience to know how to do this, ask a friend for help getting started or check at your library or student services office for a publication explaining how e-mail works.•Once you have your account set up, give your e-mail address to instructors who request it and to other students with whom you study or maintain contact.. Key Takeaways•Additional benefits of getting to know and networking with instructors include receiving references and academic advice.•Interacting with college instructors contributes to the growth and intellectual maturity that are part of what it means to be “educated.”•Prepare in advance before meeting with an instructor and communicate respectfully, honestly, and sincerely.. Your efforts will be repaid.•It is especially important for part-time and nontraditional students to make the effort to interact with instructors.•Follow accepted guidelines for professional use of e-mail with instructors.•It is worthwhile speaking with an instructor when you disagree about a grade because of what you will learn in this interaction.•Finding a mentor can be one of the most fulfilling experiences in college.. Getting to know your instructors may be the first step toward find a mentor.•Online courses involve special issues for effective learning, but you must make the effort to interact with the instructor and other students in a way that encourages your success.

Figure 7.1

Attending classes Networking and studying with other students Going to classes fully prepared Interacting with instructors through e-mail and telephone calls Paying attention in lecture classes Resolving a problem with an instructor Asking questions in class Interacting with the instructor and students in an online course Answering questions in class Giving presentations in front of the class Participating in class discussions Creating and using visual aids in a presentation Speaking with instructors outside of class Working with a student group to give a presentation. Are there other areas also in which you can improve how you interact with instructors and other students to get the most out of your college education?. Understanding why it is so important to interact well with your instructors and participate in class Understanding why it is essential to attend classes and actively engage in the learning process Preparing for and being comfortable participating in class Discovering the best communication practices for asking and answering questions in class Staying active in lecture classes to increase your learning Adapting your learning style when an instructor has a different teaching style Building a relationship with an instructor outside of class and finding a mentor Writing professional e-mails to instructors and others Interacting with the instructor of an online course and coping with its difficult issues Preparing for and delivering a successful class presentation Working with other students on a group presentation. Students who actively interact with others in the educational experience are much more successful than passive students who do not.. Yet relatively few college students consistently interact with their instructors and other students in class.. Typically only five to seven students in a class, regardless of the class’s size, do most of the participating.. Interacting with instructors and participating in class discussions with other students is among the most important steps you can take to make sure you’re successful in college.. The real essence of a college education is not just absorption of knowledge and information but learning a way of thinking that involves actively responding to the ideas of others.. To understand why interaction is so important in college, let’s look again at some of the typical differences between high school and college instructors:. But if you ask questions when you don’t understand and actively seek out your instructor during office hours to more fully discuss your ideas for a paper, then the instructor will likely give you the help you need.

One of the first steps for becoming a successful student is to understand the learning process itself. Certain characteristics of effective learning, including the four-step learning cycle, are true of all people. At the same time, people have different learning styles. Understanding these processes is important for maximizing your own learning while in university.

At the same time, people have different learning styles.. One student may learn more effectively from listening to the instructor.. University students are expected to listen to their instructors in class and remember and understand what is said.. Chapter 3 “Listening, Taking Notes, and Remembering” provides tips to help you pay close attention, take good notes, and recall the information and ideas you have heard.. Hearing them talk from their class notes may be more helpful than reviewing your own written notes.. Talk with your instructor if you feel you are not understanding course readings.. If you are a visual learner, work on developing your reading and listening skills, too, because you will need to learn in these ways as well.. Study with other students who may learn better by reading or listening.. In addition to improving their reading and listening skills, students with this style can enrich their learning by focusing on what they and others feel about the information and ideas being learned.. Study with other students who may learn better by reading or listening.. ___ Review your class notes to make sure you understand.

Public speaking—giving an oral presentation before a class or another group of people—is a special form of interaction common in education. You will likely be asked to give a presentation in one of your classes at some point, and your future career may also involve public speaking. It’s important to develop skills for this form of communication.

Analyze your audience and goals Plan, research, and organize your content Draft and revise the presentation Prepare speaking notes Practice the presentation Deliver the presentation. But you still need to think about what they already know, and don’t know, about your topic.. Am I using the best words for this topic and this audience?. Practice two or three times just to find the right words to explain your points and feel more comfortable working with your notes.. Don’t keep looking at your notes.. But don’t focus on any one person in the audience for too long, which could make them nervous or cause them to look away.. For example, the person developing the visuals should be talking to those doing the researching and drafting to see what visuals are needed and get started finding or creating them.. how students make good eye contact with the audience; the first student’s natural speaking voice and tone, and how she did not have to use her note cards very often (obviously she practiced well); some differences among these students; the use of PowerPoint slides within the presentation (some better than others); the appropriate occasional use of humor; the division of presentation responsibilities within the student group; each presenter’s interaction with the audience.. If you were assigned along with three other students to give a group presentation in the class using this textbook, what would be your preferred role in the preparation stages?

We’ve already discussed the many benefits of participating in class as a form of actively engaging in learning. Not everyone naturally feels comfortable participating. Following some general guidelines makes it easier.

Smaller classes generally favor discussion, but often instructors in large lecture classes also make some room for participation.. In a small class, the instructor may encourage students to ask questions at any time, while in some large lecture classes the instructor may ask for questions at the end of the lecture.. Don’t ever feel a question is “stupid.” If you have been paying attention in class and have done the reading and you still don’t understand something, you have every right to ask.. On the other hand, unless the instructor asks students to hold all question until the end of class, don’t let too much time go by, or you may forget the question or its relevance to the topic.. If you drift off during the first half of class and then realize in the second half that you don’t really understand what the instructor is talking about now, don’t ask a question about something that was already covered.. It may be appropriate in some cases to make a follow-up comment after the instructor answers your question, but don’t try to turn the class into a one-on-one conversation between you and the instructor.. You don’t want to ask a question whose answer was already given by the instructor in the lecture.. When you have the opportunity to ask questions in class, it’s better to ask right away rather than saving a question for after class.. When the instructor’s teaching style matches your learning style, you are usually more attentive in class and may seem to learn better.. T F To avoid having to answer a question in class when you don’t know the answer, sit in the back row and avoid making eye contact with the instructor.

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