Romeo and Juliet Prologue Analysis, Line by Line (2022)

Jule Romans is the author of "Take Advice from Shakespeare" and other books. She has over 30 years of experience in the field of education.

Romeo and Juliet Prologue Analysis, Line by Line (1)

If you are struggling to make sense of the prologue to Romeo and Juliet, try this handy line-by-line analysis. We start first with the prologue in its entirety and a quick summary of the facts. Then, we move on to a translation and explanation of each line individually.

The Prologue to Romeo and Juliet

Two households, both alike in dignity
(In fair Verona, where we lay our scene),
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life,
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Doth with their death bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-marked love
And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove,
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage—
The which, if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.

Summary of the Romeo and Juliet Prologue

  • The prologue to Romeo and Juliet is a sonnet with 14 lines of iambic pentameter in an ABAB CDCD EFEF GG rhyme scheme.
  • It sets the scene for the play by hinting at most of the action to come.
  • the first stanza describes the setting and basic conflict of the play.
  • The second stanza describes the young lovers and their dilemma.
  • The third stanza tells how the family feud will finally end in tragedy, and explains the focus of the play.
  • The last two lines remind the audience that there is more to come when the play is acted onstage.

Romeo and Juliet Prologue Analysis: First Stanza

Rhyme Scheme and Iambic Pentameter

The rhyme scheme, as you may note, is ABAB, and all lines are in iambic pentameter. Note how the lines have been broken up to show the meter:

[1] Two house / holds, both / alike / in dig / nity (A)

[2] (In fair / Vero / na, where / we lay / our scene), (B)

[3] From an /cient grudge / break to / new mu / tiny, (A)

[4] Where ci / vil blood / makes ci / vil hands / unclean. (B)

Review Iambic pentameter and Romeo and Juliet sonnets.

Two high-class families have been fighting for years in the city of Verona, Italy. They are soon to become embroiled in violence again. Their old grudges will erupt in bloodshed and stain their hands.

Two households, both alike in dignity

Two families, both equally respected

Note the perfect iambic pentameter of this line: Two HOUSE/ holds BOTH / a LIKE / in DIG /ni TY. The two households referred to here are the Capulets and Montagues.

This line "Two households..." has its own in-depth interpretation that can help you better understand Romeo and Juliet.

The Montagues and The Capulets

Both families are equally high in rank within the city of Verona. Remember that in the time period of the play, a "household" might include extended family, friends, and servants. So, the two households could make up a large part of the population of a smaller town.

(In fair Verona, where we lay our scene),

In the pleasant city of Verona, where this play will take place

Verona is in northern Italy. The play is intended to take place in the 14th or 15th century. That would be about 100 years in the past, to Shakespeare's audience.

This line simply makes clear that the setting of the play will be in Italy, not England.

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From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,

An old grudge and simmering resentment between the two families will burst into new violence.

The Capulets and Montagues have a long-standing feud that affects everyone in town. Even their servants hate each other. Though this feud has not erupted in violence for awhile, it will soon do so.

The very first scene of the play (the one that follows this prologue) is a brawl that starts because of some harsh words between the servants of both families.

Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.

The violence of the fighting between these families puts blood on the hands of civilians.

The Montagues and Capulets get blood on their hands, when they should really be avoiding this kind of low-class brawl.

A Double Meaning

Consider the play on words here with the two uses of the word "civil." Even though they are supposed to be "civil" or seemly, decent, and well-behaved families, not soldiers, they still shed blood and are guilty of violence.

Also think of the image created by hands being unclean and stained with blood. These two things are examples of the poetic use of language in this prologue.

Romeo and Juliet Prologue Analysis: Second Stanza

Rhyme Scheme and Iambic Pentameter

Note the rhyme scheme that continues according to the pattern of a sonnet. The iambic pentameter continues as well, even though it is not marked.

[5] From forth the fatal loins of these two foes (C)

[6] A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life, (D)

[7] Whose misadventured piteous overthrows (C)

[8] Doth with their death bury their parents' strife. (D)

Two lovers are born from these warring families. Their death will cause the Montagues and Capulets to finally end their feud.

A more in-depth analysis of the Romeo and Juliet death scene reveals the details of the double suicide where the star-crossed lovers die in the Capulet tomb.

From forth the fatal loins of these two foes

These two enemies bore children.

"From forth the fatal loins" is a reference to birth. Loins is another word for the area between the legs. A baby comes forth from its mother's loins.

Referring to them as "fatal" implies immediately that the outcome may be deadly for the child or parent. "These two foes" are the Montagues and the Capulets.

In the next line, we are to discover that there will be two children, one from each family.

A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life,

Two lovers are born from the families. Their love is doomed by fate because of their birth to warring families.

"Star-crossed" is the phrase that implies fate. The stars, or fates, are against the lovers from the start, as if their astrology dooms them. We can assume that one child will be a boy, and one will be a girl, and that they will fall in love.

We do know that Romeo is the boy born into the Montague family and Juliet is the girl born into the Capulet family.

What does "Take Their Life" Mean?

"Take their life" can be read two ways: to take life from (or be born), or to take life away from (or kill). In other words, the prologue gives you a hint about how this play will end, with the lovers taking their own lives.

"Take their life" means, on the surface, that these two children gain life from their mothers. However, since we know that both Romeo and Juliet commit suicide, the phrase "take their life" has a double meaning that foreshadows later events.

Whose misadventured piteous overthrows

Whose struggles and defeats should inspire our pity.

This line is likely placed to enhance the rhythm of this sonnet. Its meaning is somewhat ambiguous. Misadventures are bad adventures, or bad experiences. Piteous implies that we should feel great sympathy for the lovers.

The Meaning of "Misadventured Piteous Overthrows"

The word "overthrows" refers to a lesser-known definition of the word. It is: "a removal from power, a defeat or downfall." In this case, "overthrows" refers to their attempts to thwart the hatred between the families and turn it to love.

In their love, Romeo and Juliet rebel against the family feud. Thus, the lovers will have bad experiences worthy of pity and eventually be defeated. However, keep in mind that we have to stretch pretty far to come up with this interpretation.

Doth with their death bury their parents' strife.

When the lovers die, the Montagues and Capulets finally stop fighting.

The death of Romeo and Juliet is pre-determined with this line. The audience now knows how the story will end. The two lovers will die and the families will end the feud because of this.

(Video) 2. Annotation of Romeo and Juliet - The Prologue

Also note the double meaning of burying strife with death. When the lovers die, they are buried. The conflict between the families dies as well, and is buried along with Romeo and Juliet.

Romeo and Juliet Prologue Analysis: Third Stanza

Rhyme Scheme and Iambic Pentameter

This third set of four lines is the third stanza. Note the rhyme scheme continues with the sonnet pattern:

[9] The fearful passage of their death-marked love (E)

[10] And the continuance of their parents' rage, (F)

[11] Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove, (E)

[12] Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage (F)

The fear-filled and thrilling story of how the lovers died, and how that death was the ONLY thing that could end the feud, these are the things we will perform onstage today. The play will tell the story of how the feud was ended by the death of the two young lovers.

The fearful passage of their death-marked love

The thrilling story of their doomed love that will cause them to die

"Fearful passage" is a poetic way of saying the progress of their love is full of fear. In Shakespeare's time, this also meant a story was thrilling to the audience.

Their love is marked for death from the very beginning. We are again reminded that the end of the story will be tragic. We begin the play by knowing the end of the story.

What we don't know is HOW that end will come about. This keeps the audience and readers interested, and foreshadows the famous balcony scene of Romeo and Juliet.

And the continuance of their parents' rage,

And the anger that continues between the lovers' parents...

This line depends on the next line to make it complete. But, it begins by telling us that the story will include the continuing anger between the families. It implies that this "rage" will negatively affect everyone.

The real meaning comes in the next line.

Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove,

The anger was so strong that, except for the death of their children, nothing could take it away.

Shakespeare has a tendency to reverse the order of words. In this line, that is most apparent. What it says is: only the death of the children could take away the rage. "Naught" means nothing.

So when we read "naught could remove" it means "nothing could remove."

This line combines with the line before it in order to make sense.

The complete meaning, then, is: The continuing feud between the Montagues and Capulets will only be ended because of the deaths of Romeo and Juliet.

Nothing else would be strong enough to end the hate.

Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage—

Is what we will perform for you here on this stage.

The chorus is now telling the audience that the whole story just laid out will be performed on the stage.

"Two hours traffic" means that for the next two hours, the performers will come and go onstage to enact the story. It is somewhat odd that the line says two hours.

In general, Shakespeare's plays were much longer than two hours. They often lasted several hours or even an entire afternoon. This anomaly is interesting to people who wish to look deeper.

Romeo and Juliet Prologue Analysis: Final Couplet

Rhyme Scheme and Meaning

Note that the last two lines rhyme with each other, creating a final couplet as required by the format of a sonnet.

[13] The which, if you with patient ears attend, (G)
[14] What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend. (G)

This couplet has a simple meaning. It tells the audience that "If you pay attention to the play, everything will become clear. All the details missed in the prologue will be revealed in the performance."

The which, if you with patient ears attend,

This performance, if you will listen carefully and be patient

The play will tell the whole story, if the audience will watch closely. "Attend" means to pay attention. We know that the audience does more than listen, but Shakespeare chooses to use the word ears, implying that listening to the words will be important. This makes sense because of the poetry of the play.

What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.

The actors will work hard to perform this story and fill in any details this prologue leaves out.

(Video) Romeo and Juliet Prologue Method Analysis

"What here shall miss" means: What has not been said here in this prologue. The chorus explains that the upcoming play will cover many more events that were mentioned.

Using the words "toil" and "strive" implies that the performers will be taking great care to demonstrate the story. The key thing to keep in mind is that the entire prologue is a setup to this final line.

This line is the introduction to the play, preparing the audience to get ready and pay attention.

The Prologue to Romeo and Juliet

[1]-- Two households, both alike in dignity (A)
[2]-- (In fair Verona, where we lay our scene), (B)
[3]-- From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, (A)
[4]-- Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. (B)
[5]-- From forth the fatal loins of these two foes (C)
[6]-- A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life, (D)
[7]-- Whose misadventured piteous overthrows (C)
[8]-- Doth with their death bury their parents' strife. (D)
[9]-- The fearful passage of their death-marked love (E)
[10]- And the continuance of their parents' rage, (F)
[11]- Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove, (E)
[12]- Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage— (F)
[13]- The which, if you with patient ears attend, (G)
[14]- What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend. (G)

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

Questions & Answers

Question: Why did Shakespeare use the sonnet form for the prologue?

Answer: We don't know for sure, but it seems possible that the sonnet form was chosen because of the sonnet's strict order and structure.

The events of the play will be chaotic. The words of the sonnet tell a story of potential violence and disarray.

Yet, these words are contained in a very orderly poetic form. The contrast of these two things adds complexity and depth to Shakespeare's prologue.

One other popular theory proposes that the sonnet form is chosen because Romeo and Juliet is a love story, and sonnets are associated with love. This may be the case.

However, it seems more likely that this theory is an interpretation that we can put on the prologue as we look back on the play. It may not have been a deliberate choice on Shakespeare's part.

We have no way to know for sure, as I said, but it is enjoyable to study and consider.

Question: Can you elaborate on how love and fate are represented in Romeo and Juliet?

Answer: If you are looking for representations of love and fate together, you need to look no further than lines 6 and 7 of the prologue. Both of those lines, taken together, strongly imply that fate plays a huge role in the play. Use of the term "star-crossed lovers" is a rather obvious reference to fate.

The stars are against Romeo and Juliet. The stars, in fact, are at cross purposes to the young lovers. Therefore, Romeo and Juliet are "star-crossed," and fated to suffer from circumstances beyond their control.

A less obvious representation of fate comes with the phrase "misadventured piteous overthrows." There is the sense of sadness (piteous), and tragic life-altering mistakes (misadventured overthrows). These events are beyond the lovers' control, and a strong representation of fate.

These two lines set up line 8, where the use of "fearful passage" and "death-marked" are used in direct linkage to the love between Romeo and Juliet.

Here in the prologue, we see that death is a foregone conclusion, and that the lovers are fated to die from their passionate connection.

Question: “The which, if you with patient ears attend, what here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend”. What does this line in the prologue of Romeo and Juliet mean?

Answer: In short, it means "If you will patiently listen to this story which we will soon act out for you here onstage, what I have not explained here, we will show you in our performance."

Let's break it down:

"The which" refers to the lines before. That is, the story of the love and death of Romeo and Juliet, and the feud between the Capulets and Montagues.

"If you with patient ears attend" means "If you will patiently listen"

"What here shall miss" means whatever has been missed, or not completely explained, by this prologue.

"Our toil" is the work of the actors in performing the play.

"Shall strive to mend" means that the performance will mend, or fix, any gaps in the story. The performance itself will explain any ideas that have been missed by the statements in the prologue.

Thus, the line means:

"If you will patiently listen to the upcoming performance, all the details that the prologue may have left out will be shown onstage by the actors in this play."

Question: What is the tragic theme of "Romeo and Juliet"?

Answer: There are several possible themes to discuss in "Romeo and Juliet."

(Video) Romeo and Juliet | Prologue Analysis

It sounds as though you are looking for something that connects well with the definition of tragedy. In this case, one of the themes could be that unrestrained passion is fatal.

We see examples of this sort of thing throughout the play. Friar Laurence has several speeches that admonish against rash and violent actions. Tybalt as a complete character demonstrates the destruction of passionate emotions that are not balanced with dignity. From the very beginning of the play, unrestrained emotion drives characters to devastating violence.

A typical theme of "Romeo and Juliet" might be, simply, "love." But that is too simplistic.

The TRAGIC theme of the play is better stated as: "unrestrained passion can be fatal." Passion certainly was fatal for many of the characters in the play, and not just Romeo and Juliet.

Question: What is the setting of "Romeo and Juliet"?

Answer: "Romeo and Juliet" takes place in the 14th century in the city of Verona, Italy.

Question: Why does Shakespeare tell us how the story is going to end?

Answer: I know it might seem odd that Shakespeare tells us the ending of the Romeo and Juliet story in the prologue. But, it really wasn't all that unusual in Elizabethan England. This was a common practice in theater at the time.

The concept began with Greek theater, and was revived in Shakespeare's time. Typically, the prologue would reveal the key points of the story.

The audience wouldn't mind at all. In fact, some audiences would prefer this type of predictable performance.

Question: Is Romeo and Juliet a tragedy or a comedy?

Answer: Technically, The play Romeo and Juliet is neither a tragedy nor a comedy.

The play does not fit the classical definition of tragedy. In a traditional tragedy, there must be a main character who begins as a good person, but has a fatal flaw that leads to downfall, and eventually, death. Before death, that main character must also have a moment of insight, and express some form of awareness that there has been a fall from grace.

None of the characters in Romeo and Juliet fulfill all of these characteristics. Friar Laurence comes closest. However, even though Friar Laurence does evidence a fatal flaw, downfall, and insight, he does not die.

Romeo and Juliet both die, of course, but they do not show evidence of the progression required to be considered tragic heroes.

So, Romeo and Juliet is not easily classified as a tragedy.

A Shakespearean comedy has a lighthearted tone and typically ends with the marriage of several characters, or another celebration of some sort. I think we can all agree that Romeo and Juliet does not fit with this definition of comedy.

Therefore, Romeo and Juliet is not classified as a tragedy and does not fit the requirements of a comedy, either.

Question: Why did Shakespeare write a prologue?

Answer: No one is really sure of Shakespeare's motives in writing this prologue. However, the prologue to Romeo and Juliet sets up the story very effectively.

It would be very common in Shakespeare's time for audiences to know all about a story before they ever saw it acted onstage. So, it's not unusual that the prologue sets the scene and tells everything that is happening in the play before it even begins.

The great thing about this prologue, though, is that it really adds weight to the "star crossed lovers" theme by increasing the sense of fate.

From the very beginning, the fate of the young lovers is already decided. This theme of fate weaves its way throughout the rest of the play and is underscored by the prologue itself.

So, while we don't know exactly why Shakespeare wrote it, we certainly know why it is a perfect way to start the play.

Question: what does the chorus ask of the audience in the last two lines of Romeo and Juliet?

Answer: In the last two lines of the prologue, the chorus says:

"The which if you with patient ears attend,

What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend."

The chorus is asking the audience to pay close attention to the actions that will soon take place on stage.

© 2014 Jule Romans

(Video) Prologue to Romeo and Juliet top grade analysis

FAQs

What does the line of the prologue mean in Romeo and Juliet? ›

The Prologue does not merely set the scene of Romeo and Juliet , it tells the audience exactly what is going to happen in the play. The Prologue refers to an ill-fated couple with its use of the word “star-crossed,” which means, literally, against the stars.

How is the prologue structure in Romeo and Juliet? ›

Prologue: Structure

The structure of the prologue in Romeo and Juliet is an Elizabethan/Shakespearean sonnet. There are different types of sonnets. An Elizabethan sonnet is a 14-line poem that is split up into three quatrains (stanzas of four lines) and a couplet (a stanza of two lines).

What are the main themes of Romeo and Juliet prologue? ›

Summary and Analysis Act I: Prologue

Shakespeare chooses this poetic form to outline the play's main issues of love and feuding and to present another major theme: how true love ultimately triumphs because the deaths of Romeo and Juliet end the feud between their families.

How many lines are in the Romeo and Juliet prologue? ›

Shakespeare wrote the prologue of "Romeo and Juliet" in the form of a Shakespearean sonnet, which means that the prologue is a poem with 14 lines written in iambic pentameter. The sonnet also contains a specific rhyme scheme (abab cdcd efef gg) and can be broken down into three quatrains and a final rhyming couplet.

What literary device is used in the prologue of Romeo and Juliet? ›

Shakespeare makes use of several literary devices in 'Act I Prologue'. These include but are not limited to allusion, alliteration, and enjambment. The first of these, allusion, is the most prominent. This entire fourteen-line sonnet is one extended example of allusion.

What is the significance of prologue? ›

The definition of prologue introduce important information—such as background details, or characters—that have some connection to the main story, but whose relevance is not immediately obvious.

What is the tone of the prologue in Romeo and Juliet? ›

How does Shakespeare's choice of the word death-marked develop the tone of the play? The word “death marked (9) develops the tragic tone of the Prologue by describing the lovers as marked for death.

How is fate described in the prologue? ›

The prologue introduces the theme of fate when the lovers are called star-crossed and death-marked . This means that the events of their lives, and their deaths, are somehow already decided. There are lots of incidences throughout the play when the main characters refer to omens that hint at their tragic ending.

Why is the prologue in Romeo and Juliet written as a sonnet? ›

In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare presents the Prologue as a sonnet in order to point to the play's themes of love and the feud because sonnets were often used to address the subject of love in conflict.

What event is foreshadowed in the prologue? ›

The prologue, prior to the beginning of the first act, explicitly foreshadows important events of the play. For instance, the ill-fated double suicide of the young lovers is predicted by the chorus in the prologue.

What are 5 themes in Romeo and Juliet? ›

The literary themes throughout Romeo and Juliet have made the story an enduring tragedy for generations of audiences. Death, life, love, hatred, obligation, and destiny all play a hand in the play's famous ending.

How is hate described in the prologue? ›

In the prologue both love and hate are prominent, yet hate is stronger. Love is demonstrated in line 6, where it reads, "A pair of star crossed lovers take their life".

How many lines are in the prologue? ›

Translation
First 18 lines of the General Prologue
And smale foweles maken melodye,And small fowls make melody,
That slepen al the nyght with open eyeThat sleep all the night with open eye
(So priketh hem Nature in hir corages);(So Nature pricks them in their hearts);
16 more rows

What is the importance of lines 5 and 6 in Romeo and Juliet? ›

Highlight lines 5 and 6. Explain the importance of these two lines. a. Tells the reader that this play is a tragedy and they lovers will die, and to „hook‟ the audience into learning more about these two lovers.

What are examples of alliteration in the prologue of Romeo and Juliet? ›

Act 1, Prologue

This is an example of alliteration with the letters "f" and "l." The line starts the second quatrain of the play's prologue (which is also a sonnet) and is used to strike a notable change in subject from the feud between the two families to the fatal alliance between their children.

Which line from Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare is an example of alliteration? ›

In Scene 4, lines 15 and 16, Mercutio describes what has happened to Romeo since he's fallen in love with Juliet. Mercutio believes Romeo has been shot with Cupid's arrow. He says, 'The very pin of his heart cleft with the bow-boy's butt shaft. ' The 'b' sound repeated in these lines is an example of alliteration.

Who is the old desire in line 1? ›

Old desire is Rosaline, the old love of Romeo; Juliet is the new love that Romeo has set his eyes upon. Alliteration is present with the repetition of the "d" sound and "desire doth in his deathbed" is personification in that desire cannot literally die.

Which best describes the purpose of this excerpt of the prologue? ›

Which best describes the purpose of this excerpt of the prologue? It builds suspense about the war in the play.

What does a prologue contain? ›

The prologue in a book is always written by the author of the book. In the prologue, the author gives an introduction that sets the scene for the story to come. It is part of the book and should be read before chapter 1.

What is prologue literary device? ›

prologue, a preface or introduction to a literary work. In a dramatic work, the term describes a speech, often in verse, addressed to the audience by one or more of the actors at the opening of a play.

How is the mood conveyed in the prologue of Romeo and Juliet? ›

The prologue creates a dark, ominous mood for the rest of the play to come because the audience knows that there will be violence and tragic deaths throughout the play.

What is the tone of the Romeo and Juliet prologue What words or phrases help to create this tone? ›

Answer and Explanation: Because this is such a sad play that ends in death and tragedy, it isn't surprising that thetone of the sonnet that functions as aprologue for Romeo and Juliet is somber and sad. We are told directly in the prologue that Verona's two prominent families, or houses, have a long-standing feud.

How was the tragic tone in the prologue established? ›

How does Shakespeare's choice of the word death-marked develop the tone of the Prologue? The word death-marked (line 9) develops the tragic tone of the Prologue by describing the lovers as marked for death.

How is family described in the prologue of Romeo and Juliet? ›

They describe two families of equal nobility whose “ancient grudge” has reached new heights—the citizens of Verona are now, too, being roped into the families' “new mutiny.” The chorus describes “a pair of star-crossed lovers,” one from each family, who will, in taking their own lives, mend their parents' feud.

Is Romeo and Juliet fate or free will? ›

Though they did make their own choices, the story of Romeo and Juliet is controlled by fate over free will because of Juliet's relationship with her father, the build-up of misunderstandings, and the resolve that followed their death.

Who speaks the prologue What is the prologue purpose? ›

Who speaks the Prologue? The Chorus speaks the prologue. What is the purpose of the Prologue? The purpose of the prologue is to introduce the audience to what is going to happen later on in the story.

What lines foreshadow Juliet's death? ›

Juliet says to the Nurse,"If he be married, my grave is like to be my wedding bed." She means if he is married she will die unmarried because she can't love anyone else, but it foreshadows her death if she marries him.

Which words in the prologue point to the influence of fate in the deaths of Romeo and Juliet? ›

The words in the Prologue that influence of fate in the deaths of Romeo and Juliet is a pair of star-crossed lovers take their life. What effect will their deaths have on their parents' quarrel? The effect that their death has on their parent's quarrel is their deaths will end it. You just studied 13 terms!

What does the prologue of Romeo and Juliet foreshadow? ›

The deaths of Romeo and Juliet are the most heavily foreshadowed events in any of Shakespeare's plays. We learn that the lovers will die in the Prologue: “A pair of star-crossed lovers… Doth with their death bury their parents' strife” (1.1..).

What is the most important message in Romeo and Juliet? ›

Love is naturally the play's dominant and most important theme. The play focuses on romantic love, specifically the intense passion that springs up at first sight between Romeo and Juliet. In Romeo and Juliet, love is a violent, ecstatic, overpowering force that supersedes all other values, loyalties, and emotions.

What is the moral lesson of the story Romeo and Juliet? ›

One of the central themes of Romeo & Juliet is passion, which manifests equally in love and in violence. Both are powerful and conflicting forces throughout the story, but ultimately, it's love that conquers hate.

How do you analyze Romeo and Juliet? ›

Analysis of Juliet from 'Romeo and Juliet' - YouTube

What is the setting of the prologue Romeo and Juliet? ›

The setting is "fair Verona," a town in Italy where two rival upper-crust families (the Capulets and the Montagues) have been feuding for as long as anyone can remember.

What here shall miss our toil meaning? ›

work hard. What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend. In the prologue of Romeo and Juliet, the chorus (person speaking) explains that the playgoers should "toil", meaning "work hard" at paying attention to the play so as to understand the full story which is only summarized in the prologue. strive.

Does the prologue of Romeo and Juliet have more to do with love or hate? ›

The first five lines of the prologue aren't about love but they are about hatred. As the prologue is in the form of a chorus and choruses generally repeat throughout the play it signifies that hate will be an eminent theme during Romeo and Juliet.

How many characters are in a prologue? ›

In Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, 32 characters make the trip to Canterbury. 29 of these are mentioned in line 24 of the “General Prologue.” The narrator joins this group (making 30).

What do the first six lines of the speech reveal about Juliet's conflict? ›

The first six lines of the speech reveals that Juliet is scared about her situation. Juliet questioning Friar Laurence shows that she is thinking more logically and shows that she is more level-headed.

Which line of dialogue from Act III Scene I of Romeo and Juliet most foreshadows that Mercutio's death will lead to other tragic events in the story? ›

gloomy mood. Which line of dialogue from Act III, scene i of Romeo and Juliet most foreshadows that Mercutio's death will lead to other tragic events in the story? Not; Prince: Romeo slew him, he slew Mercutio; Who now the price of his dear blood doth owe?

What more do we learn about the story from the prologue in Act Two? ›

What more do we learn about the story from the Prologue in act two? Romeo has fallen out of love with Rosaline, got over her quickly, and instead fell in love with Juliet.

A line by line analysis of the prologue to Romeo and Juliet. Two households, both alike in dignity(In fair Verona, where we lay our scene),From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.From forth the fatal loins of these two foesA pair of star-crossed lovers take their life,Whose misadventured piteous overthrowsDoth with their death bury their parents' strife.The fearful passage of their death-marked loveAnd the continuance of their parents' rage,Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove,Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage—The which, if you with patient ears attend,What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.. Two lovers are born from the families.. The audience now knows how the story will end.. The two lovers will die and the families will end the feud because of this.. The complete meaning, then, is: The continuing feud between the Montagues and Capulets will only be ended because of the deaths of Romeo and Juliet.. (B)[5]-- From forth the fatal loins of these two foes (C)[6]-- A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life, (D)[7]-- Whose misadventured piteous overthrows (C)[8]-- Doth with their death bury their parents' strife.. (D)[9]-- The fearful passage of their death-marked love (E)[10]- And the continuance of their parents' rage, (F)[11]- Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove, (E)[12]- Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage— (F)[13]- The which, if you with patient ears attend, (G)[14]- What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.. Answer: If you are looking for representations of love and fate together, you need to look no further than lines 6 and 7 of the prologue.. What does this line in the prologue of Romeo and Juliet mean?. That is, the story of the love and death of Romeo and Juliet, and the feud between the Capulets and Montagues.. Passion certainly was fatal for many of the characters in the play, and not just Romeo and Juliet.. Question: Why does Shakespeare tell us how the story is going to end?. Answer: I know it might seem odd that Shakespeare tells us the ending of the Romeo and Juliet story in the prologue.. Question: what does the chorus ask of the audience in the last two lines of Romeo and Juliet?

The very first scene of the play (the one that follows this prologue) is a brawl that starts because of some harsh words between the servants of both families.. Their death will cause the Montagues and Capulets to finally end their feud.. Two lovers are born from the families.. It is: “a removal from power, a defeat or downfall.” In this case, “overthrows” refers to their attempts to thwart the hatred between the families and turn it to love.. The audience now knows how the story will end.. The two lovers will die and the families will end the feud because of this.. The play will tell the story of how the feud was ended by the death of the two young lovers.. This line depends on the next line to make it complete.. This line combines with the line before it in order to make sense.. The complete meaning, then, is: The continuing feud between the Montagues and Capulets will only be ended because of the deaths of Romeo and Juliet.. The chorus is now telling the audience that the whole story just laid out will be performed on the stage.. “Two hours traffic” means that for the next two hours, the performers will come and go onstage to enact the story.. “What here shall miss” means: What has not been said here in this prologue.. Using the words “toil” and “strive” implies that the performers will be taking great care to demonstrate the story.

Ο Πρόλογος στον Ρωμαίο και την Ιουλιέτα Περίληψη του Προλόγου Romeo and Juliet Romeo and Juliet Prologue Analysis: First Stanza, Rhyme Scheme Rhyme Scheme and Iambic Pentameter Δύο νοικοκυριά, και τα δύο εξίσου αξιοπρεπή The Montagues και The Capulets (Στη δίκαιη Βερόνα, όπου τοποθετούμε τη σκηνή μας), Από το αρχαίο σπάσιμο της μνησικακίας στη νέα ανταρσία, Όπου το αστικό αίμα κάνει τα πολιτικά χέρια ακάθαρτα.. Romeo and Juliet Prologue Analysis: Third Stanza Rhyme Scheme and Iambic Pentameter Το φοβερό πέρασμα της αγάπης τους με το θάνατο Και η συνέχεια της οργής των γονιών τους, Το οποίο, αλλά τα παιδιά τους τελειώνουν, τίποτα δεν θα μπορούσε να το αφαιρέσει, Είναι τώρα η κίνηση δύο ωρών της σκηνής μας Romeo and Juliet Prologue Analysis: Couplet and Turn Σχήμα και σημασία Το οποίο, εάν παρακολουθείτε με αυτιά ασθενών, Αυτό που θα χάσει εδώ, ο κόπος μας θα προσπαθήσει να διορθωθεί.. Δύο νοικοκυριά, και τα δύο εξίσου αξιοπρεπή(Στη δίκαιη Βερόνα, όπου τοποθετούμε τη σκηνή μας),Από το αρχαίο σπάσιμο της μνησικακίας στη νέα ανταρσία,Όπου το αστικό αίμα κάνει τα πολιτικά χέρια ακάθαρτα.Από εκεί και πέρα ​​οι μοιραίοι οσφυϊκοί αυτοί οι δύο εχθροίΈνα ζευγάρι εραστές σταυρωμένων αστεριών αφαιρούν τη ζωή τους,Του οποίου η κατά λάθος αποτρόπαια ανατροπέςΜε τον θάνατό τους θάβουν τη διαμάχη των γονιών τους.Το φοβερό πέρασμα της αγάπης τους με το θάνατοΚαι η συνέχεια της οργής των γονιών τους,Το οποίο, αλλά τα παιδιά τους τελειώνουν, τίποτα δεν θα μπορούσε να το αφαιρέσει,Είναι τώρα η κίνηση δύο ωρών της σκηνής μαςΤο οποίο, εάν παρακολουθείτε με αυτιά ασθενών,Αυτό που θα χάσει εδώ, ο κόπος μας θα προσπαθήσει να διορθωθεί.. Η γεμάτη φόβο και συναρπαστική ιστορία για το πώς πέθαναν οι εραστές και πώς αυτός ο θάνατος ήταν το ΜΟΝΟ πράγμα που θα μπορούσε να τερματίσει τη διαμάχη, αυτά είναι τα πράγματα που θα ερμηνεύσουμε στη σκηνή σήμερα.. (ΡΕ)[9]-Το φοβερό πέρασμα της αγάπης τους με σήμανση θανάτου (Ε)[10]- Και η συνέχεια της οργής των γονιών τους, (F)[11]- Το οποίο, αλλά τα παιδιά τους τελειώνουν, τίποτα δεν θα μπορούσε να το αφαιρέσει, (Ε)[12]- Είναι τώρα η κίνηση δύο ωρών της σκηνής μας (F)[13]- Το οποίο, εάν παρακολουθείτε με αυτιά ασθενών, (G)[14]- Αυτό που θα χάσει εδώ, ο κόπος μας θα προσπαθήσει να διορθωθεί.

The prologue is a sonnet.. Shakespeare purposely emphasizes the word “two” because the poem is about two lovers and love is about two lovers.. Notice that the setting of the sonnet changes with the word break .. “Civil blood” and “civil hands” in line 4 are examples of synecdoche, a special type of metaphor where the part represents the whole or the whole represents the parts.. The use of synecdoche parallels the feud insomuch that the feuding families affect the safety and well being of the entire city.. Line 5 contains alliteration: “From forth the fatal loins of the two foes.” This begins the second quatrain and marks a change in focus from the feud of the two families to the dalliances of the two lovers in question.. What happens to these two lovers whose love ends their lives… The end to their parents' hatred… which can only be ended by the death of these two lovers… is what the play’s about.. “Heart We Will Forget Him” by Emily Dickinson - Having trouble forgetting that special someone who just dumped you?. “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe - This poem about the death of a loved one is sure to make you feel sad.

The ‘ Act II Prologue ’ is the third of three sonnets that appear within Shakespeare’s best-known play, Romeo and Juliet.. The first is the prologue of Act I and the second is the scene where Romeo and Juliet meet in Act I Scene 5.. In the ‘Act II Prologue’ by William Shakespeare the chorus speaks on the growing love between Romeo and Juliet and how difficult it is for them to meet.. There is a good example in the first lines of the poem when Shaksepare compares the old love that Romeo used to carry for Rosaline as dying in its death bed.. In the first four lines of the ‘Act II Prologue’ the speaker, who is the “Chorus” begins by describing the blossoming love that exists between Romeo and Juliet as well as the larger family dynamics at play.. In the second quatrain of the sonnet, the speaker goes on to say that there is someone, Juliet clearly, who is in love with Romeo.. In the third and final quatrain the speaker adds that because Romeo is “held a foe,” or considered to be a foe, he does not have easy access to Juliet.

As light appears at Juliet's window above, Romeo begins his metaphoric comparison of Juliet to the sunrise.. The line also shows how a slight shift in the syntactic order, shifting the word "breaks" to the end of the phrase rather than directly following the subject of "light," is used to make the line better fit the meter.. It begins with a pyrrhic , which isn't such an oddity in itself, but the scansion following the mid-line caesura causes some consternation unless A) Shakespeare intended Juliet to be pronounced more like "JOOL-yet" instead of "JOOL-i-ET," or B) "is the sun" is intended as an anapest to end the line.. Anyway, Romeo romantically compares the window to the eastern horizon at dawn; he hasn't seen Juliet appear yet (at least in most interpretations of the script), but, like the dim light appearing before sunrise, the light heralds her arrival.. Romeo here continues the moon metaphor by alluding to the normally wan appearance of the moon in the sky and imbuing the moon (as the goddess Diana) with sadness as the reason for its pallor.. Much like "kill the envious moon" above, Romeo again calls Juliet to action.. Romeo concludes his musings upon Juliet's chastity with a line that echoes his earlier call for Juliet to "kill the envious moon.". On the more literal level, Romeo is saying that Juliet needs to cast off her "vestal livery," which we can take as a fairly blunt wish that Juliet should doff her frock.. An interesting hypothesis is that perhaps Shakespeare originally had Juliet complete the line as if to herself, which might have prompted Romeo to speak his next line.. This line features a couple of Shakespeare favorites: the trochaic inversion at the beginning of the line and the feminine ending .. Romeo poetically says over the course of three lines that the two most beautiful stars above should ask Juliet's eyes to fill in for them if they need to be elsewhere.. ...and if Juliet's eyes traded places with the stars, Romeo reasons, then her cheek would still outshine the stars.

It is referring to the two families who have been involved in conflict for many years but we never learn who or why the conflict started.. hire writer. ‘ A pair of star cross’d lovers take their life ‘, shows that the play will have a tragic ending so you know from the beginning.. Shakespeare has used this here to reveal the fate he has planned for the forbidden lovers.. Even from just the prologue you can see the hatred the two families have for each other.. To which Abram replies ‘do you bit your thumb at us, sir?. Throughout Romeo and Juliet, conflict is explored in many contrasting themes such as love and hate.. Death is repeatedly mentioned during the play and the older characters know ‘they are born to die’ whilst the younger characters in the play have their lives cut short by early death.. Throughout the play there are 5 deaths, however they are all deaths of young people (Mercutio, Tybalt, Paris, Romeo and Juliet.).. Words and phrases such as ‘untimely death, deathbed and death’s darting eye are used.. Life seems to conflict with ever-present death.. When Romeo is exiled from Verona for the murder of Tybalt, Juliet and Friar Lawrence devise a plan so that Juliet will not have to marry Paris.. She will take a ‘potion’ that will make it look like she is dead but however only lasts for 48 hours.. It is now finally that the ending that had been pre planned is unveiled.. In conclusion I think that Shakespeare explores conflict in five main sections ; love and hate, fate and free will, death and life, public and private and light and dark.. So in two deaths comes a new beginning for others.

Despite Pepys’ dislike, the play is one of Shakespeare’s best-loved and most famous, and the story of Romeo and Juliet is well known.. In the summary and analysis that follow, we realise that Romeo and Juliet is much more than a tragic love story.. After the Prologue has set the scene – we have two feuding households, Montagues and Capulets, in the city-state of Verona; and young Romeo is a Montague while Juliet, with whom Romeo is destined to fall in love, is from the Capulet family, sworn enemies of the Montagues – the play proper begins with servants of the two feuding households taunting each other in the street.. When Juliet enquires after who Romeo is, she is distraught to learn that he is a Montague and thus a member of the family that is her family’s sworn enemies.. Romeo goes to see a churchman, Friar Laurence, who agrees to marry Romeo and Juliet.. Convinced that Juliet is really dead, Romeo drinks poison in order to join Juliet in death.. Is Romeo and Juliet the great love story that it’s often interpreted as, and what does it say about the play – if it is a celebration of young love – that it ends with the deaths of both romantic leads?. Romeo and Juliet is often read as both a tragedy and a great celebration of romantic love, but it clearly throws out some difficult questions about the nature of love, questions which are rendered even more pressing when we consider the headlong nature of the play’s action and the fact that Romeo and Juliet meet, marry, and die all within the space of a few days.. The play’s most famous line references the feud between the two families, which means Romeo and Juliet cannot be together.. The line is spoken by Juliet: ‘Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?’ Of course, ‘wherefore’ doesn’t mean ‘where’ – it means ‘why’.. In Romeo and Juliet , the headlong passion and excitement of young love is celebrated, even though confusion leads to the deaths of the young lovers.. We know that Romeo and Juliet is about young love – the ‘pair of star-cross’d lovers’, who belong to rival families in Verona – but what is odd about Shakespeare’s play is how young he makes Juliet.. This makes sense in so far as Juliet represents young love, but what makes it unsettling – particularly for modern audiences – is the fact that this makes Juliet a girl of thirteen when she enjoys her night of wedded bliss with Romeo.. These references to physical love serve to make Juliet’s innocence, and subsequent passionate romance with Romeo, even more noticeable: the journey both Romeo and Juliet undertake is one from innocence (Romeo pointlessly and naively pursuing Rosaline; Juliet unversed in the ways of love) to experience.

Ang Prologue kina Romeo at Juliet Buod ng Romeo at Juliet Prologue Romeo at Juliet Prologue Analysis: Unang Stanza, Rhyme Scheme Rhyme Scheme at Iambic Pentameter Dalawang kabahayan, parehong kapwa may dignidad Ang Montagues at The Capulets (Sa patas na Verona, kung saan inilalagay natin ang aming eksena), Mula sa sinaunang pagkasira ng sama ng loob hanggang sa bagong pag-aalsa, Kung saan ginawang marumi ang mga sibil na kamay.. Isang Dobleng Kahulugan Romeo at Juliet Prologue Analysis: Pangalawang Stanza Rhyme Scheme at Iambic Pentameter Mula sa nakamamatay na mga balakang ng dalawang kalaban na ito Isang pares ng mga mahihilig sa bituin ang kumitil sa kanilang buhay, Ano ang ibig sabihin ng "Dalhin ang Kanilang Buhay"?. Romeo at Juliet Prologue Analysis: Ikatlong Stanza Rhyme Scheme at Iambic Pentameter Ang nakakatakot na pagdaan ng kanilang pagmamahal na minarkahan ng kamatayan At ang pagpapatuloy ng galit ng kanilang mga magulang, Alin, ngunit natapos ang kanilang mga anak, wala nang maalis, Ngayon ba ay trapiko ng aming yugto ang dalawang oras Romeo at Juliet Prologue Analysis: Couplet at Turn Rhyme Scheme at Kahulugan Na kung saan, kung ikaw ay may pasyente na tainga dumalo, Kung ano ang makaligtaan dito, ang ating pagsusumikap ay magsisikap na ayusin.. Ang Prologue sa Romeo at Juliet mga tanong at mga Sagot. Dalawang kabahayan, parehong kapwa may dignidad(Sa patas na Verona, kung saan inilalagay natin ang aming eksena),Mula sa sinaunang pagkasira ng sama ng loob hanggang sa bagong pag-aalsa,Kung saan ginawang marumi ang mga sibil na kamay.Mula sa nakamamatay na mga balakang ng dalawang kalaban na itoIsang pares ng mga mahihilig sa bituin ang kumitil sa kanilang buhay,Kaninong hindi nagkakamali na nakakainis na mga overtakeDahil sa kanilang kamatayan, inilibing ang pagtatalo ng kanilang mga magulang.Ang nakakatakot na pagdaan ng kanilang pagmamahal na minarkahan ng kamatayanAt ang pagpapatuloy ng galit ng kanilang mga magulang,Alin, ngunit natapos ang kanilang mga anak, wala nang maalis,Ngayon ba ay trapiko ng aming yugto ang dalawang orasNa kung saan, kung ikaw ay may pasyente na tainga dumalo,Kung ano ang makaligtaan dito, ang ating pagsusumikap ay magsisikap na ayusin.. Mula sa nakamamatay na mga balakang ng dalawang kalaban na ito. Ang alitan sa pagitan ng mga pamilya ay namatay din, at inilibing kasama sina Romeo at Juliet.. Ang linya na ito ay pinagsasama sa linya bago ito upang magkaroon ng kahulugan.. Ang pangunahing bagay na dapat tandaan ay ang buong prologue ay isang pag-set up sa huling linya na ito.. (B)[5] - Mula sa nakamamatay na mga balakang ng dalawang kaaway (C)[6] - Isang pares ng mga mahihilig sa bituin ang tumagal ng kanilang buhay, (D)[7] - Kaninong hindi nagkakamali na piteous overthrows (C)[8] - Sa kanilang kamatayan inilibing ang pagtatalo ng kanilang mga magulang.. (D)[9] - Ang nakakatakot na pagpasa ng kanilang pag-ibig na minarkahan ng kamatayan (E)[10] - At ang pagpapatuloy ng galit ng kanilang mga magulang, (F)[11] - Alin, ngunit ang kanilang mga anak ay nagtatapos, wala nang maalis, (E)[12] - Ay ngayon ang trapiko ng dalawang oras ng aming yugto (F)[13] - Ang kung saan, kung ikaw ay may pasyente na tainga dumalo, (G)[14] - Ano ang makaligtaan dito, ang ating pagsusumikap ay magsusumikap na ayusin.. Iyon ay, ang kwento ng pag-ibig at pagkamatay nina Romeo at Juliet, at ang alitan sa pagitan ng mga Capulet at Montagues.

The epilogue to Romeo and Juliet i s spoken by Prince Escalus at the very end of the play.. The epilogue to Romeo and Juliet is similar to a Shakespearean sonnet in both meter and rhyme scheme.. Shakespearean sonnets have 14 lines with a specific rhyme scheme and meter.. Shakespearean sonnets are written in iambic pentameter.. The epilogue to Romeo and Juliet is written in iambic pentameter.. In other performances, the director may choose to have Prince Escalus deliver the speech as a monologue.. He says that peace comes this morning, but that it is a sad and gloomy kind of quiet.. The best way to understand the meaning of this line is to rearrange the order of the words.. Thus, the Prince of Verona is saying:. Even the sun is too sad to show its face. Romeo and Juliet are both dead, and the sun itself is also sad for all the events that have occurred.. Go out from here now, and talk more about all these very sad events.. This is a good and easy example because every word in this line is a different syllable.. There are many characters who could be implicated in the deaths of Romeo and Juliet.. Note that in this line, the stress on the end of the word punished changes how it sounds.

can you love the gentleman?. ‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy;. Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.. Romeo, doff thy name,. And for that name which is no part of thee. Take all myself.. a very good. whore!’ Why, is not this a lamentable thing,. grandsire, that we should be thus afflicted with. these strange flies, these fashion-mongers, these. perdona-mi’s, who stand so much on the new form,. that they cannot at ease on the old bench?. Why,. thou wilt quarrel with a man that hath a hair more,. or a hair less, in his beard, than thou hast: thou. wilt quarrel with a man for cracking nuts, having no. other reason but because thou hast hazel eyes: what. eye but such an eye would spy out such a quarrel?. Thy head is as fun of quarrels as an egg is full of. meat, and yet thy head hath been beaten as addle as. an egg for quarrelling: thou hast quarrelled with a. man for coughing in the street, because he hath. wakened thy dog that hath lain asleep in the sun:. didst thou not fall out with a tailor for wearing. his new doublet before Easter?

The prologue to Romeo and Juliet is a significant piece of text in the play as both its form and content introduces and gives a rather detailed insight to the viewer about events that are to follow in the play and essentially prepares and establishes the viewer/audience for the “two hours traffic on our stage” which is and gives meaning to the tragedy of Romeo and Juliet.. Essay Writing Service The entire prologue is spoken by the Chorus to the intended audience and eludes the viewer to the problems that arise throughout the play, as well as acknowledges existing problems prior to the ones that will eventuate.. The location of the scene is established through the phrase “in fair Verona where we lay our scene”, as well as indicates central themes to Romeo and Juliet by mentioning themes of anger and revenge through the ongoing feuds of the “two households, both alike in dignity” and the central theme of love and tragedy, through the mentioned “fatal loins of these two foes” and “star-crossed lovers” being Romeo and Juliet.. Perhaps because the play is centred on love, Shakespeare wrote the prologue in this form in order to emphasise this concept within the play as well as the intimate relationship between Romeo and Juliet.. In this sonnet, the 14 lines are divided up into 3 sections of 4 lines and the last section is made up of 2 lines.. The two rhyming lines at the end of the prologue are typical of a traditional sonnet and are effective examples of combining form and content together in a simple enough form for the audience to understand and get meaning from the prologue and indeed the rest of the play.. Aggressive words such as “mutiny, “blood” and “rage” are unstressed in the sonnet possibly may because even though it is a story surrounding issues of conflict, it is love and Romeo and Juliet who are the central meaning behind the play.. In line 8 of the prologue, there is noticeable use of alliteration with the “d” and “th” sounds, which are repeated to make the line appear more noticeable and also contains its own rhyming section using ‘doth with their death’, using the ‘th’ sound to make it rhyme.. Alliteration in line 5 has not only the repetition of f sounds but of bold words for example “from forth the fatal loins of these two foes” which contains words that begin with f as well as “forth” that tends to be used as a word of initiative in which Shakespeare could be playing upon the idea as mentioned previously that possibly, the storyline is already set and must “go forth” as it is destined to happen.. Meaning cannot be derived if there is no content in which to base a story on and a series of literary techniques such as those present in the prologue of Romeo and Juliet, place an emphasis on this particular content in order to convey the underlying message that Shakespeare is presenting to the audience.. In the case of Romeo and Juliet, it is evident that Shakespeare intended the play to be a tragedy based on love, and the prologue spoken by the chorus depicts this clearly.

Videos

1. Romeo and Juliet Prologue. Revision and analysis. Chorus: A pair of star-crossed lovers take life
(Mark Birch)
2. Romeo and Juliet Prologue Translation
(Teacher Sarah Harris)
3. Analysis of The Prologue from Romeo and Juliet
(Mr M Beasley)
4. Romeo and Juliet Prologue: Analysis
(a hamid)
5. Romeo and Juliet Prologue // Grade 9 analysis (captions and annotations)
(English Revision)
6. Romeo and Juliet Prologue Analysis
(Taryn Galasso)

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