Whoso List to Hunt: Poem, Analysis & Summary (2022)

'Whoso List to Hunt' (1530s) was one of the first sonnets to be written in English. Its content can be considered the kind of scandal that would fill newspapers, and the author was a prisoner, a poet, a knight and the King's love rival! Here we will look closely at Sir Thomas Wyatt's famous poem, its theme and context.

'Whoso List to Hunt': summary

Sir Thomas Wyatt's 'Whoso List to Hunt' is a Petrarchan sonnet, widely believed to be one of the first written in English. The Petrarchan sonnet predates the more famous Elizabethan sonnet, popularised by William Shakespeare. As typical of most traditional sonnets 'Whoso List to Hunt' is essentially a love poem. The poem speaks of a hunt for a deer which is unsuccessful. The hunt mentioned in the poem is an extended metaphor for the speaker's pursuit of romantic desire.

Petrarchan sonnet is a poem made up of 14 lines split into two stanzas. An octave (8 lines) with a rhyme scheme ABBAABBA and a sestet (6lines) with a rhyme scheme CDECDE.

Extended metaphor is a single metaphor that runs throughout a poem. It is extended over multiple lines or stanzas in a poem.

At the beginning of the poem, the speaker introduces the hunt as a desperate affair where they have found little success. The speaker talks of being "wearied' by the "vain travails". This suggests that they are tired of the pointless effort they have made. The speaker is so wearied that they find themselves at the back of the hunt. Despite the speaker's weariness, they cannot tear themselves away from the deer they are hunting.

Whoso List to Hunt: Poem, Analysis & Summary (1)In the poem, the speaker is hunting a deer, a metaphor for the speaker's romantic pursuit. A deer. Pixaby.

The speaker continues to talk about how catching their prey is as difficult as catching the wind in a net. They warn others that if they tried to catch the deer they would also find little success. In the final sestet, the reader is informed of a warning on the deer's neck. Written in diamonds are the words "do not touch me, for I belong to Caesar".

Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am," - The warning written around the deer's neck- Line 13

'Whoso List to Hunt' is heavily inspired by 'Sonnet 190' (1530s) by Francesco Petrarch. Petrarch's poem is also about a love unrequited. Wyatt's poem focuses on the emotional and physical drain the pursuit has on the speaker. The poem's tone is exasperated and desperate. In Wyatt's poem the speaker mentions that whoever wishes to hunt the hind would 'spend his time in vain'. Reflecting the speaker's own failed attempt in 'the hunt'. In Petrach's sonnet the speaker is more content to see the woman as a dream vision rather than an object of desire..

(Video) Whoso List to Hunt by Sir Thomas Wyatt - Poem Analysis

'Whoso List to Hunt': Sir Thomas Wyatt biography

Sir Thomas Wyatt was born in 1503 in Kent, England. He was an English poet known for introducing the sonnet into English literature. Wyatt was educated at Cambridge and as an adult became a member of the court of King Henry VIII. He was popular in court both for his skills with language and music, but also for his attractiveness.

Sir Thomas Wyatt was closely associated with the Boleyn family. It was rumoured that he had an affair with Anne Boleyn. This rumour proved dangerous as later Henry VIII had a desire to marry Anne Boleyn. It is the rumoured affair that likely caused Wyatt to be imprisoned in 1536. Strangely enough, Thomas Wyatt was knighted a year later. He was then sent out on diplomatic missions abroad. This could have been to keep Wyatt from Anne Boleyn. Sir Thomas Wyatt died in October 1542 of hyperthermia.

Whoso List to Hunt': poem

Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind,

But as for me, hélas, I may no more.

The vain travail hath wearied me so sore,

I am of them that farthest cometh behind.

Yet may I by no means my wearied mind

Draw from the deer, but as she fleeth afore

(Video) Whoso List to Hunt by Sir Thomas Wyatt || A-Level Poetry Analysis

Fainting I follow. I leave off therefore,

Sithens in a net I seek to hold the wind.

Who list her hunt, I put him out of doubt,

As well as I may spend his time in vain.

And graven with diamonds in letters plain

There is written, her fair neck round about:

Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am,

And wild for to hold, though I seem tame.

'Whoso List to Hunt': analysis and themes

Now we will analyse the main themes of the sonnet.

Violent pursuit of love

The poem's major theme is love, particularly unrequited love. Despite its theme, it is not a romantic poem. The poem is an extended metaphor to describe the speaker's relation as an unsuccessful hunt. The speaker often refers to their hunt being in vain. The deer they are pursuing seemingly cannot be caught.

(Video) Whoso List to Hunt By Sir Thomas Wyatt Analysis

This metaphor equates love with violence, the deer representing the object of the speaker's desire. The metaphor could be seen as problematic or even threatening, presenting the speaker as hunting a woman they wish to woo. Blurring the lines between love and violence. The speaker is desperate to entrap the deer and the prey has little say in this.

The speaker is one of many hunters after the deer. These fellow hunters could be interpreted as the speaker's love rivals. Of which the speaker has found themselves behind in the pursuit. In the poem, the speaker is exhausted by their fruitless chase of the deer. The speaker's dedication has them physically and mentally worn out. Their obsession is the cause of their anguish.

Gender roles

In the first octave, the poem appears to reinforce traditional gender roles. The speaker is a man engaging in a hunt. This male is in pursuit of a woman they desire. Although the woman in question does not wish for their attention. This gives the impression that the woman is something that can be possessed, a trophy for the speaker.

The pursued woman however does not wish to be caught. This can be seen as a rejection of the speaker's idea of love. Where it is up to the man to capture the woman. The deer refuses the speaker or hunter's wishes. In the final lines the deer's neck warns that though they seem tame, they are wild.

Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am, And wild for to hold, though I seem tame." -The full warning on the neck of the deer.

However, there are other men hunting the deer. The warning refers Caesar, a famous emperor. This could be suggestive that a more powerful hunter may already possess her. Which would render the woman powerless. The reference to Caesar could possibly be an allusion to Henry VIII.

The poem appears to go back and forth in its representation of gender roles. First, there is the familiar trope of a man pursuing a woman. This is followed by the woman showing resistance to the idea. Only for her to seem possessed by a powerful man at the end of the poem.

'Whoso List to Hunt': context

Francesco Petrach was an Italian poet. He was one of the first poets (post-classical) to write in his own language, as opposed to Latin or Greek. Petrarch turned the sonnet from a bawdy song into a more literary form. Sir Thomas Wyatt's 'Whoso List to Hunt' is an early example of a sonnet written in English.

(Video) "Whoso List to Hunt" By Sir Thomas Wyatt Explained

Wyatt's poem is greatly inspired by Petrarch's 'Sonnet 190'. Both poems speak of unrequited love. In Petrarch's sonnet, there is a dream-like image of a deer wearing a necklace. 'Whoso List to Hunt' concentrates more on the hunt, and its draining effects. While it may seem strange today that poets would imitate each other, it was quite common in Wyatt's time.

The poem was written at the time of the English Reformation. When Henry VIII broke away from the catholic church so he could marry Anne Boleyn. Sir Thomas Wyatt was close to Henry's court and even closer to Anne Boleyn. The two were widely suspected of having an affair and some elements of the poem could be seen as a reference to their relationship.

The speaker of the poem is dejected and exhausted in their pursuit of love. This suggests that the woman he loves is unavailable to him. Which the potential queen certainly would be. There is an allusion to Caesar in the final lines. Caesar, like Henry, is a powerful man to whom the woman in the poem claims to belong.

Whoso List to Hunt: Poem, Analysis & Summary (2)Henry VIII, a potential love rival for Wyatt? Pixabay.

'Whoso List to Hunt': literary devices

Here we will look at some of the literary devices used by Thomas Wyatt, looking at rhyme, meter and the poem's form

Form

The poem is divided into one octave and a sestet. All Petrarchan sonnets contain fourteen lines and are set the same way. The octave is used to introduce an idea, in this case, the hunt and the speaker's desperation. The sestet gives the reader a reason for the speaker's troubles, the deer carrying a warning. The sestet opens in the same way as the octave, the title of the poem. This could be to reassert to speaker's desperation.

Meter

The poem is in iambic pentameter, which later became the most common meter used for sonnets in English. Wyatt most likely used this meter as it is used by Chaucer in The Canterbury Tales (1392). The iambic pentameter is not strictly adhered to in the first line of the octave and sestet. This could be to represent the speaker's desperate exhaustion.

An Octave is a stanza consisting of 8 lines. Can sometimes be known as an Octet.

A Sestet is a stanza that is formed of six lines.

Rhyme scheme

Wyatt's poem uses a rhyme scheme common to the Petrarchan sonnet. For the octave, the rhyme scheme is ABBA ABBA. This repetition is effective to reflect the speaker's obsessive nature. The sestet has a rhyme scheme of CDD CEE. All the rhyming words in the poem are simplistic, and a lot are monosyllabic. This could be due to it being one of the first examples of an English sonnet.

(Video) Whoso List to Hunt

Whoso List to Hunt - Key takeaways

  • 'Whoso List to Hunt' was one of the first sonnets to be written in English.
  • The poem was written in the early 16th century by Sir Thomas Wyatt.
  • 'Whoso List to Hunt' is a Petrarchan sonnet that uses an extended metaphor of a hunt to represent a romantic pursuit.
  • The poem 'Whoso List to Hunt' uses iambic pentameter and has a rhyme scheme of ABBAABBA CDD CEE.
  • The main themes of the poem 'Whoso List to Hunt' are love and gender.

FAQs

Whoso List to Hunt: Poem, Analysis & Summary? ›

“Whoso List to Hunt” is a poem about unrequited love, but it's not exactly romantic. The speaker describes pursuing a woman (rumored to be Anne Boleyn, with whom Wyatt had an affair in real life) and uses an extended metaphor to convey the dynamics of their relationship: it's like hunting a deer he can't catch.

What does Whoso List mean? ›

However, the meaning of the title, 'Whoso List to Hunt' is simple enough to get the idea of the poem. Here, “Whoso” means whoever, and “list” means wish or contend. So, the title says, “whoever wishes or contends to hunt”. Whatsoever, the full title of the poem is the first line itself.

Who so list to Hount I know where is an Hynde analysis? ›

- 'Whoso list to hount I know where is an hynde' is written from the perspective of a male speaker courting a woman who is unattainable. male hands and she was seen as his dependent. alludes to his knowledge of where to “hunt” for a woman.

Who is Caesar in Whoso list to hunt? ›

Obviously, Wyatt was trying to avoid saying anything too obvious about the king, or his wife, or about his (Wyatt's) earlier fascination with her. By referring to Henry as "Caesar," Wyatt makes Henry seem like a famous and powerful Roman, but one whose life didn't end so well.

What might the deer represent in Whoso list to hunt? ›

Sexism. The object of the hunt in Wyatt's sonnet is a hind, a female deer, which is held to represent the person of Anne Boleyn. The deer is hunted as prey and wears a collar that proclaims her ruler's ownership over her.

Who list her hunt I put him out of doubt meaning? ›

'Whoso List to Hunt': summary. The poem might be summarised thus: the speaker addresses the world, claiming that if anyone should choose ('list') to go hunting, the speaker knows of a hind (female deer), but the speaker must count himself out of the chase.

What kind of poet was Thomas Wyatt? ›

Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503 – 11 October 1542) was a 16th-century English politician, ambassador, and lyric poet credited with introducing the sonnet to English literature.

What is the theme of Whoso list to hunt? ›

“Whoso List to Hunt” is a poem about unrequited love, but it's not exactly romantic. The speaker describes pursuing a woman (rumored to be Anne Boleyn, with whom Wyatt had an affair in real life) and uses an extended metaphor to convey the dynamics of their relationship: it's like hunting a deer he can't catch.

Is Whoso list to hunt a conceit? ›

“Whoso List to Hunt” uses the conceit of a hunt to illustrate the speaker 's pursuit of a woman, represented by a female deer or “hind” (1). The hunt is an excellent representation of desire; it illustrates the one-sided, predatory, and often ineffectual chase of a man to his prey.

What is the structure of Whoso list to hunt? ›

Thus, the rhyme scheme of "Whoso List to Hunt" (ABBAABBACDDCEE) is almost identical to Petrarch's, as is the poem's structure (octave followed by sestet). In this sense, then, Wyatt was planting his poem in ground that Petrarch had already cultivated. At the same time, though, his imitation helped to spawn a tradition.

What is the metaphor in Whoso list to hunt? ›

'Whoso list to hunt' by Sir Thomas Wyatt is an extended metaphor which is all about a deer hunt in which a hind is being chased by several riders. In this the riders represent young men and the hind represents a woman, probably Anne Boleyn.

What figurative language does Wyatt use comparing the female in the poem to a deer? ›

- Extended Metaphor/Conceit : Through out the poem, Wyatt is comparing his unattainable women to a 'hind' (deer) and his pursuit for his affection a hunt. Because the metaphor lasts through out the whole poem, it is an extended metaphor, or conceit.

What warning does the speaker give potential hunters of the woman? ›

"Whose List to Hunt" What warning does the speaker give potential hunters of the woman? "Whose List to Hunt" What Image does the speaker use to show he's finally decided the chase is hopeless? "Since in a net I seek to hold the wind" -- Trying to hold the wind in a net.

What is the critical appreciation of a poem? ›

What is a Critical Appreciation of a Poem? Critical Appreciation of a poem is evaluating, understanding & analyzing a Literary piece of work from a DISCERNING point of view. 1. Identify the Author's thesis: Thesis (main idea) of a poem.

What does graven with diamonds in letters plain mean? ›

And graven with diamonds in letters plain. There is written, her fair neck round about, We do, however, learn a strange a little detail about this "hind." There are letters "graven" (i.e., written, inscribed, etched) around her neck that say something. Oh, and they are "graven with diamonds"—whatever that means.

How does Spencer seek to immortalize the beloved? ›

Spenser tells her that he will preserve and eternalize her and their love by writing about them in his poetry. He acknowledges that they are mortal, but his work will live on and continue to tell his story and proclaim his love even after he and his beloved die.

How many lines does a sonnet have? ›

English poets borrowed the sonnet form from the Italian poet Francesco Petrarch. Traditionally, it has fourteen lines of iambic pentameter linked by an intricate rhyme scheme. Iambic pentameter refers to its rhythm; basically, each line of the poem has ten syllables, and every other syllable is stressed.

What more miraculous thing may be told? ›

What more miraculous thing may be told, That fire, which all things melts, should harden ice, And ice, which is congeal'd with senseless cold, Should kindle fire by wonderful device?

Is a sonnet? ›

The sonnet is a popular classical form that has compelled poets for centuries. Traditionally, the sonnet is a fourteen-line poem written in iambic pentameter, employing one of several rhyme schemes, and adhering to a tightly structured thematic organization.

What is the major theme of Wyatt's poetry? ›

Petrarchan sonnets and the poems of Wyatt treats “love” as the major theme. The poem delineates the nature of Love as something that could make a person feel sorrow, pain, joy, and confusion at the same time.

Who is father of English sonnet? ›

Petrarch, Father of the Sonnet | Folger Shakespeare Library.

What should I say poem analysis? ›

The poem, “What Should I Say”, stands divided into four stanzas, each having 7 lines. The rhyme scheme is a b a b b c c. Most of the lines are end-stopped and this thing gives a strangely strong feeling to the lyric. The poem has even been composed in such a way as to be sung beautifully (like any lyric) with the lute.

What is the scrutiny poem about? ›

'The Scrutiny' is a poem by Richard Lovelace (1617-57), one of the leading Cavalier poets of the seventeenth century. The poem is essentially a defence of 'playing the field' and a renunciation of the poet's former declaration of faithfulness to his lover.

Where Whenas death shall all the world subdue? ›

Where whenas death shall all the world subdue, Our love shall live, and later life renew. ' When he and she are together in the afterlife together, their existence will be all the richer because he has praised her in his poems, making her almost divine through his verse.

What paradoxes can you find in Sonnet 30? ›

Explanation. The paradox in "Sonnet 30" is that he is like fire and his love is like ice. We would expect ice to be melted by fire and fire to be weakened by ice, but he instead burns even stronger with his love, and instead of melting she is "hardened".

What is the rhyme scheme of Sonnet 75? ›

It has an ABAB BCBC CDCD EE rhyme scheme and it is written iniambic pentameter. The main themes in Sonnet 75 are immortality and love.

Why is the Sun described as half as happy? ›

The sun, the speaker says, is half as happy as he and his lover are, for the fact that the world is contracted into their bed makes the sun's job much easier—in its old age, it desires ease, and now all it has to do is shine on their bed and it shines on the whole world.

What does the speaker hope their combined effect will be on the lady? ›

b) What does the speaker hope their combined effect will be on the lady? - The combined effect of these three things will make the lady know that he adores and loves her, and that he sees the beauty she has.

Which of the following is one of the three key ways in which primate societies are diverse? ›

Which of the following is one of the three key ways in which primate societies are diverse? Primates vary in the social relationships they form for the long term.

What might an anthropologist study if they are using an Ethnoprimatological approach? ›

What might an anthropologist using an ethnoprimatological approach study? Correct Answer(s) : the effects of deforestation on primate populations - Since primates primarily live in forests, deforestation activities are devastating to primate populations around the world.

How do you write a summary of a poem? ›

Identify imagery in the poem, such as the use of metaphors or similes to describe something in a unique way. Write down what effect this could have on readers. Write about the overall tone of the poem and the narrative perspective. Decide if the poem is funny or serious.

What is difference between analysis and appreciation? ›

Are Analysis and Critical Appreciation same? No, analysis is checking out every detail of something. almost like research. While appreciation is respect for the poem, you can overlook the flaws and still enjoy something about it.

How do you write a critical analysis? ›

How to Write a Critical Analysis Essay
  1. Read Thoroughly and Carefully. ...
  2. Choose a Thesis Statement. ...
  3. Write an Introductory Paragraph. ...
  4. Carefully Organize the Body of Your Essay. ...
  5. Craft Clear Topic Sentences. ...
  6. Populate Your Essay With Evidence. ...
  7. Summarize Your Analysis in a Concluding Paragraph. ...
  8. Revise as Necessary.
Jun 7, 2021

Who is Caesar in Whoso list to hunt? ›

Obviously, Wyatt was trying to avoid saying anything too obvious about the king, or his wife, or about his (Wyatt's) earlier fascination with her. By referring to Henry as "Caesar," Wyatt makes Henry seem like a famous and powerful Roman, but one whose life didn't end so well.

Why so list to hunt I know where is an Hynde? ›

Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind, But as for me, hélas, I may no more. The vain travail hath wearied me so sore, I am of them that farthest cometh behind.

Is Whoso list to hunt a Petrarchan sonnet? ›

- “Whoso List to Hunt” is a Petrarchan Sonnet and is partly a translation and imitation of one of Petrarch's sonnets; “Sonnet 190”. - Wyatt brought the sonnet form over through his translation/ imitation in the 1530s/ 40s. This made England one of the last countries to adopt the sonnet form.

Why does the poets beloved call him Vayne man? ›

She said these words to the poet lover Spenser. Vayne means full of vanity and boastfulness. 'Vaine' means uselessly or without the desired result.

How did the speaker try to immortalize the name of his beloved? ›

The poet speaks of his trying to immortalize the woman he loves by writing her name in the sand. He tries to challenge nature, or God, by trying to write her name in a place that is only going to disappear each time.

How will the poet verse make his beloved immortal? ›

The point the poet is making is that, by committing the beauty of his beloved to the "eternal lines" of poetry, he ensures, in a way, that the beloved, too, will be kept alive. As long as the poet's words live, the beloved will be, in a way, still alive too.

Is they flee from me a sonnet? ›

The verse form of 'They Flee from Me' is a form known as rhyme royal, rhymed ababbcc. The form was first used in English poetry by Geoffrey Chaucer, in his long narrative poem Troilus and Criseyde (a poem about a doomed love affair, oddly enough).

How many lines does a sonnet have? ›

English poets borrowed the sonnet form from the Italian poet Francesco Petrarch. Traditionally, it has fourteen lines of iambic pentameter linked by an intricate rhyme scheme. Iambic pentameter refers to its rhythm; basically, each line of the poem has ten syllables, and every other syllable is stressed.

Is a sonnet? ›

The sonnet is a popular classical form that has compelled poets for centuries. Traditionally, the sonnet is a fourteen-line poem written in iambic pentameter, employing one of several rhyme schemes, and adhering to a tightly structured thematic organization.

What is the theme of they flee from me? ›

Love and Relationships. “They Flee From Me” expresses an idea that most modern readers can relate to: love and relationships are complicated! In the poem, the speaker tries to make sense of the fact that while women use to “seek” him, now they actively avoid him.

Who list his wealth and ease retain? ›

Who list his wealth and ease retain, Himself let him unknown contain. Where the return stands by disdain: For sure, circa regna tonat.

When her loose gown from her shoulders? ›

When her loose gown from her shoulders did fall, And she me caught in her arms long and small; Therewith all sweetly did me kiss, And softly said, 'Dear heart, how like you this?

What is the theme of the sonnet? ›

The Shakespearean Sonnet

These sonnets cover such themes as love, jealousy, beauty, infidelity, the passage of time, and death. The first 126 sonnets are addressed to a young man while the last 28 are addressed to a woman.

What is 14 line poem called? ›

Sonnet. A 14-line poem with a variable rhyme scheme originating in Italy and brought to England by Sir Thomas Wyatt and Henry Howard, earl of Surrey in the 16th century.

What are the 3 types of sonnets? ›

In the English-speaking world, we usually refer to three discrete types of sonnet: the Petrarchan, the Shakespearean, and the Spenserian.

Who is the father of sonnet? ›

Petrarch, Father of the Sonnet.

What are the 2 types of sonnets? ›

Most sonnets are one of two kinds:
  • Italian (Petrarchan)- this sonnet is split into two parts, an octave and a sestet. ...
  • English (Shakespearian)- this contains 3 Sicilian quatrains and one heroic couplet at the end, with an "abab cdcd efef gg" rhyme scheme.
Aug 23, 1999

What is sonnet structure? ›

Writing a traditional sonnet requires 14 lines of iambic pentameter. Your sonnet can be arranged as a whole or broken up into three quatrains followed, followed by a two-line coda—or an octave followed by a sestet.

An early English sonnet, analysed by Dr Oliver Tearle Sir Thomas Wyatt’s ‘Whoso List to Hunt’ is one of the earliest sonnets in all of English literature. What follows is the poem…

Sir Thomas Wyatt’s ‘Whoso List to Hunt’ is one of the earliest sonnets in all of English literature .. What follows is the poem, followed by a brief introduction to, and analysis of, the poem’s language and imagery – as well as its surprising connections to King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn.. Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind,. But as for me, hélas , I may no more.. The vain travail hath wearied me so sore,. I am of them that farthest cometh behind.. Yet may I by no means my wearied mind. Draw from the deer, but as she fleeth afore. Fainting I follow.. I leave off therefore,. Since in a net I seek to hold the wind.. This sonnet is a loose translation of a poem by the fourteenth-century Italian poet Petrarch, who had been the first major poet to use the form (though Petrarch did not in fact invent the sonnet; we’ve discussed the origins of the sonnet here ).. The octave is rhymed abbaabba (as above) and the sestet adopts many different rhyme schemes; Wyatt, in ‘Whoso List to Hunt’, employs cddcee .. This is important because it introduces a couplet at the end of the sonnet that would become a fixture of the English, or ‘Shakespearean’, sonnet some half a century later.. ‘Whoso List to Hunt’: analysis. The poem stands up well on its own, thanks to its intricate play of sounds (‘hind’ playing off ‘hunt’ in that first line, for instance), so that one need not know more about Tudor politics and life at the court of Henry VIII to appreciate its message.

An early English sonnet, analysed by Dr Oliver Tearle Sir Thomas Wyatt’s ‘Whoso List to Hunt’ is one of the earliest sonnets in all of English literature. What follows is the poem…

Sir Thomas Wyatt’s ‘Whoso List to Hunt’ is one of the earliest sonnets in all of English literature .. Wyatt (1503-1542) probably wrote ‘Whoso List to Hunt’ some time during the 1530s, and the poem was published in the 1550s after his death.. This sonnet is a loose translation of a poem by the fourteenth-century Italian poet Petrarch, who had been the first major poet to use the form (though Petrarch did not in fact invent the sonnet; we’ve discussed the origins of the sonnet here ).. The poem might be summarised thus: the speaker addresses the world, claiming that if anyone should choose (‘list’) to go hunting, the speaker knows of a hind (female deer), but the speaker must count himself out of the chase.. The sestet concludes by saying that this hind has already been claimed by ‘Caesar’ (implying a king or other powerful ruler), as revealed by the declaration hanging round the deer’s neck (‘ Noli me tangere ‘ is Latin for ‘do not touch me’ – the words also have Christ-like overtones, implying that this ‘hind’ is almost divine in her beauty – Christ beseeched Mary Magdalene ‘do not touch me’ when she encountered him after the Resurrection).. The poem stands up well on its own, thanks to its intricate play of sounds (‘hind’ playing off ‘hunt’ in that first line, for instance), so that one need not know more about Tudor politics and life at the court of Henry VIII to appreciate its message.. Wyatt also displays masterly control of the movement of the sonnet: look at the way ‘behind’ at the end of the fourth line picks up, and contains, the ‘hind’ from the first line, and how ‘therefore’ a few lines on echoes ‘afore’ from the previous line.. Whether Wyatt and Anne were ever sexually or romantically involved remains unknown, but it seems likely that Wyatt admired Anne and the ‘hind’ in this poem can be seen as a veiled reference to her.. One can provide an analysis of the poem without resorting to speculation about the poet’s biography; but the Anne Boleyn connection does provide another possible meaning to the ‘hind’ of the poem.. Wyatt was among a group of ambassadors who travelled to Rome to petition Pope Clement VII to annul the marriage between Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, and during the trip, Wyatt acquired detailed knowledge of new poetic forms – chiefly, the sonnet – which he brought back with him to the English court.

Essay Sample: The essay sample on Whoso dwells on its problems, providing a shortened but comprehensive overview of basic facts and arguments related to it. To read the

To read the essay, scroll down.. ‘Whoso list to hunt’ by Sir Thomas Wyatt is an extended metaphor which is all about a deer hunt in which a hind is being chased by several riders.. The title is repeated in the very first line of the sonnet, ‘Whoso list to hunt,’ (whoever wants to pursuit) almost to make sure that you know exactly what the sonnet is going to be about.. In the very first line Wyatt introduces the reader to a metaphor used for the woman and those who want her, ‘Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind.. Also in this line he uses alliteration again, ‘so, sore,’ this is making the reader sigh – again making it seem that the narrator is worn out.. ‘ In line 7 of the sonnet he mentions how the dear runs ahead, he begins to lose hope in managing to get her, he uses alliteration again here, ‘fainting… follow,’ this is making it seem that the narrator is weary as to whether or not he will be able to catch her or whether he should give up now.. ‘ This metaphor illustrates the themes in the sonnet, unattainable love and an unobtainable goal.. This first part of the Italian Petrarch sonnet is called the octave and is where Wyatt has presented the problem, the rhyming pattern which goes with this first half of the sonnet is ABBAABBA.. This line employs a paradox wild for to hold, though I seem to tame.. The third theme, unobtainable love, shows the speaker is in love with a lady which is in king possession.. I think that by reading this sonnet the reader sympathizes with Wyatt and his unsuccessful and unreachable love, he is expressing his true love towards Anne Boleyn yet still didn’t manage to catch her.

        Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind, 

Summary : The poem opens with a question to the reader, asking who enjoys the hunt, and pointing out that the poet knows a worthy hind (female deer).. Picked out plainly in diamond lettering there is a collar around the neck of the hind.. Line 3 makes use of assonance to reveal the poet’s earlier hunting efforts as ‘vain travail’ which has tired him out to the point of physical pain.. We can see that the poem is an extended metaphor for the end of a relationship.. The poet is now at the tail end of the pursuit, although, he says in line 5 that his mind has not deviated from the hunt.. In line 8, the poet uses the concluding line of the octet to stress the futility of his former quest.. The final sestet begins with line 9 reiterating the appeal to those who wish to join the hunt, but he continues in to line 10 to explain that the pursuit will be in vain for them too.. Her collar is adorned with the Latin phrase ‘Noli Me tangere’ meaning ‘touch me not’.. The design also includes the name of her owner – ‘for Caesar’s I am.’ If we identify the poem as referring to Anne Boleyn, then her new owner would be King Henry VIII; the pair were married around the time when this poem was composed and Wyatt could no longer compete for her affections.

1557 This short poem is a translation from Seneca's Thyestes lines 391-403 . Like some of Sir Thomas Wyatt's other political laments, it is a declaration that

STANZA From the Italian for "room" or "stopping place," a stanza is a group of verse lines, usually set off in print by space between the stanzas.. The structure of any given stanza is determined by its rhyme scheme, meter, and/or number of lines; poems will generally maintain the same stanza structure throughout.. Standard English stanza forms include the couplet (two lines ending in the same rhyme), heroic couplet (iambic pentameter meter, same rhyme), tercet (three lines with the same rhyme), quatrain (four lines), ballad (a quatrain with an abab or abcb rhyme), heroic quatrain (iambic pentameter, abab), rhyme royal (iambic pentameter, ababbcc ), and Spenserian (based on The Faerie Queene, eight lines of iambic pentameter plus one of iambic hexameter).. This 352-line poem relates the discovery of a rosy-cheeked, fresh-faced, talking corpse buried in the foundation of St. Paul's Cathedral in London.. The poem begins with a brief account of how all the ancient heathen temples of London were destroyed and then rebuilt as early Christian churches under the direction of Augustine of Canterbury in the late sixth century.. London's bishop, Erkenwald, is visiting an abbey in a neighboring town as these events unfold, but as soon as he hears what is going on, he immediately returns to London on horseback.. Bishop Erkenwald then presses him for details about his perfectly preserved body and clothes.. Erkenwald then asks about the man's soul.. Although God allowed the man's body and clothes to sustain a perfected material state because of his righteousness in life, the judge lived before Christ and so was denied baptism and final salvation after death.. Erkenwald is moved to tears by the man's plight and prays aloud, wishing God would provide an opportunity for him to baptize the "virtuous heathen.". The body has just enough time to thank and bless Erkenwald before his corpse blackens and crumbles to dust.. Based on marginal notations (glosses), anagrams, and acrostics in some of the poems that appear to spell out a surname, some critics have attempted to attribute authorship of all five poems to a poet whose last name was some variation of "Massey.". Bishop Erkenwald represents the power and authority of the church, and it is his tear that ultimately baptizes the body and saves the man's soul.. Thus, Erkenwald (representing the Catholic Church) is the poem's central protagonist.

Videos

1. Whoso List to Hunt | By Sir Thomas Wyatt
(The Kinda Sorta Teacher)
2. Analysis of "Who So List To Hunt" by Sir Thomas Wyatt
(The Nature of Writing)
3. Thomas Wyatt's "Whoso List to Hunt" | In-depth Analysis
(FreeVerse)
4. Daily Poetry Readings #334: Whoso List to Hunt by Sir Thomas Wyatt read by Dr Iain McGilchrist
(Dr Iain McGilchrist)
5. Wyatt, "Whoso list to hunt"
(Peter G. Epps)
6. Whoso List to Hunt by Thomas Wyatt
(Poems Cafe)

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